Jun 18, 2020

LafargeHolcim, GE and COBOD partner on advanced turbines

GE Renewable Energy
LafargeHolcim
COBOD
Wind turbines
William Girling
3 min
Turbines
LafargeHolcim has released details of a new project it is working on with GE Renewable Energy and COBOD: super-tall turbine towers...

LafargeHolcim has released details of a new project it is working on with GE Renewable Energy and COBOD: super-tall turbine towers.

With wind turbines generally constructed from steel and precast concrete to a height of approximately 100m, the partners’ work is expected to yield a tower of 200m.

Capable of capturing stronger winds due to its increased height, the new type of wind turbine will be far more cost-effective and able to generate more power relative to shorter models. The innovation that makes this possible is a large 3D printed concrete base.

The advantages of a taller wind turbine are made apparent by LafargeHolcim: an 80m tower could yield 15.1 GWh of power annually, whereas a tower doubled in height could result in up to 33% more power at 20.2 GWh.

Pooling talent

With all three companies committed to the idea of improving renewable energy generation, each will be contributing from their own particular area of expertise:

  • GE will provide its design, manufacturing and marketing advice for the new turbines.
  • COBOD (Construction of Buildings on Demand) has the 3D printing and advanced robotics technology necessary for constructing the concrete base.
  • LafargeHolcim will create the specialised concrete used for 3D printing the base, as well as its processing and application.

Edelio Bermejo, Head of R&D for LafargeHolcim, expanded on the utility of 3D printing in the construction:

“Concrete 3D printing is a very promising technology for us, as its incredible design flexibility expands the realm of construction possibilities.

“Being both a user and promoter of clean energy, we are delighted to be putting our material and design expertise to work in this groundbreaking project, enabling cost-efficient construction of tall wind turbine towers and accelerating access to renewable energy.”

COBOD, which made history in 2017 by constructing the first building using 3D printing technology in Europe, stated that it was excited and proud to work with two leading companies in the energy sector. Henrik Lund-Nielsen, Founder, said:

“With our groundbreaking 3D printing technology combined with the competence and resources of our partners, we are convinced that this disruptive move within the wind turbines industry will help drive lower costs and faster execution times, to benefit customers and lower the CO2 footprint from the production of energy.”

Finally, Matteo Belluci Advanced Manufacturing Technology Leader for GE Renewable Energy, predicted that the success of the trio’s endeavour could result in a major disruption to the renewable energy sector.

“3D printing is in GE’s DNA and we believe that Large Format Additive Manufacturing will bring disruptive potential to the Wind Industry. Concrete printing has advanced significantly over the last five years and we believe is getting closer to have real application in the industrial world.

“We are committed to taking full advantage of this technology both from the design flexibility it allows as well as for the logistic simplification it enables on such massive components,” he concluded.

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May 18, 2021

Toyota unveils electric van and Volvo opens fuel cell lab

Automotive
electricvehicles
fuelcells
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Toyota's Proace Electric medium-duty panel van is being launched across Europe as Volvo opens its first fuel cell test lab

Toyota is launching its first zero emission battery electric vehicle, the Proace Electric medium-duty panel van, across Europe.

The model, which offers a choice of 50 or 75kWh lithium-ion batteries with range of up to 205 miles, is being rolled out in the UK, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Sweden.

At present, alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs, including battery electric vehicles) account for only a fraction – around 1.8 per cent – of new light commercial van sales in the UK, but a number of factors are accelerating demand for practical alternatives to vans with conventional internal combustion engines.

Low and zero emission zones are coming into force to reduce local pollution and improve air quality in urban centres, at the same time as rapid growth in ecommerce is generating more day-to-day delivery traffic.

Meanwhile the opening of Volvo's first dedicated fuel cell test lab in Volvo Group, marks a significant milestone in the manufacturer’s ambition to be fossil-free by 2040.

Fuel cells work by combining hydrogen with oxygen, with the resulting chemical reaction producing electricity. The process is completely emission-free, with water vapour being the only by-product.

Toni Hagelberg, Head of Sustainable Power at Volvo CE, says fuel cell technology is a key enabler of sustainable solutions for heavier construction machines, and this investment provides another vital tool in its work to reach targets.

"The lab will also serve Volvo Group globally, as it’s the first to offer this kind of advanced testing," he said.

The Fuel Cell Test Lab is a demonstration of the same dedication to hydrogen fuel cell technology, as the recent launch of cell centric, a joint venture by Volvo Group and Daimler Truck to accelerate the development, production and commercialization of fuel cell solutions within long-haul trucking and beyond. Both form a key part of the Group’s overall ambition to be 100% fossil free by 2040.

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