May 17, 2020

Does Your Business Have the Energy to Recycle?

green business
Going Green
Recycling
Adam Groff
Admin
3 min
Man holding earth
The June edition of Energy Digital is now live! By:AdamGroff Going green and saving green go hand in hand when it comes to businesses that recycle. Mos...

The June edition of Energy Digital is now live!

ByAdam Groff

Going green and saving green go hand in hand when it comes to businesses that recycle. Most businesses produce excess waste that is perfectly reusable, renewable, and recyclable.

How exactly are businesses saving money and the planet with their byproducts?

The Business of Recycling

Businesses large and small have a range of employees on staff each day and every employee adds to the amount of waste produced.

Considering most people recycle at home, if businesses consider themselves one big household, there’s no reason why they shouldn’t be recycling too. Restaurants, retail stores, and especially office buildings are all great candidates for recycling.

By simply putting a recycling bin next to the office printer or having a recycling container next to the dumpster, businesses can do their part to save the planet without really changing the way they do business.

The Benefits

Because the bottom dollar is always at the top of the list, businesses will love the cost effectiveness of recycling. Companies that recycle have lower waste removal fees and businesses that use recycled materials are eligible for government tax credits.

In addition, there are actually companies out there that pay businesses for their bulk paper and cardboard waste. Not only that, going green looks good for corporations and if they do it right, they might even be recognized with an eco-friendly business award.

Savings and public image aside, businesses that recycle are playing a huge role in saving the planet. If just a third of the major businesses in the world do their part to go paperless, recycle, and use recycled materials, it’s possible to cut world-wide waste by 10% a year.

Not only that, but businesses that are recycling their waste are also helping create jobs. Waste management is a growing industry and the recycling sector continues to grow with every aluminum can, glass bottle, and paper product recycled.

Read related content:

Recycling Programs

As stated before, every employee on staff adds to the amount of waste a company produces. And, according to the EPA, the average person produces 4.5 pounds of waste each day. That’s over one ton of solid waste a year.

By initiating workplace recycling and diversion programs, businesses can get their employees in the habit of recycling. In fact, businesses that have food-diversion programs in place cut 30% to 80% of their solid waste from ending up in landfills.

Businesses can get involved with workplace recycling programs in any number of ways. The most common way is by simply calling city waste management and having containers delivered and a pickup schedule arranged.

And, as for all those old desktop computers, fax machines, and company laptops, recycled electronics can either be dropped off at a recycling center or picked up at the office. Considering electronics sit in landfills for centuries, this is a recycling must.

When businesses do their part to recycle, it not only saves the planet, it saves money and creates new jobs.

Companies that haven’t already should try a greener approach to doing business.

About the Author: Adam Groff is a freelance writer and creator of content. He writes on a variety of topics including business improvement,online reputation management services, and green living.

 

 

 

 

 

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Jul 30, 2021

Major move forward for UK’s nascent marine energy sector

marineenergy
renewableenergy
tidalturbine
Sustainability
3 min
The UK’s nascent marine energy sector starts exporting electricity to the grid as the most powerful tidal turbine in the world begins to generate power

Although the industry is small and the technologies are limited, marine-based energy systems look to be taking off as “the world’s most powerful tidal turbine” begins grid-connected power generation at the European Marine Energy Centre

At around 74 metres long, the turbine single-handedly holds the potential to supply the annual electricity demand to approximately 2,000 homes within the UK and offset 2,200 tonnes of CO2 per year.

Orbital Marine Power, a privately held Scottish-based company, announced the turbine is set to operate for around 15 years in the waters surrounding Orkney, Scotland, where the 2-megawatt O2 turbine weighing around 680 metric tons will be linked to a local on-land electricity network via a subsea cable. 

How optimistic is the outlook for the UK’s turbine bid?

Described as a “major milestone for O2” by CEO of Orbital Marine Power Andrew Scott, the turbine will also supply additional power to generate ‘green hydrogen’ through the use of a land-based electrolyser in the hopes it will demonstrate the “decarbonisation of wider energy requirements.” 

“Our vision is that this project is the trigger to the harnessing of tidal stream resources around the world to play a role in tackling climate change whilst creating a new, low-carbon industrial sector,” says Scott in a statement. 

The Scottish Government has awarded £3.4 million through the Saltire Tidal Energy Challenge Fund to support the project’s construction, while public lenders also contributed to the financial requirements of the tidal turbine through the ethical investment platform Abundance Investment.

“The deployment of Orbital Marine Power’s O2, the world’s most powerful tidal turbine, is a proud moment for Scotland and a significant milestone in our journey to net zero,” says Michael Matheson, the Cabinet Secretary for Net-Zero, Energy and Transport for the Scottish Government. 

“With our abundant natural resources, expertise and ambition, Scotland is ideally placed to harness the enormous global market for marine energy whilst helping deliver a net-zero economy.

“That’s why the Scottish Government has consistently supported the marine energy sector for over 10 years.”

However, Orbital Marine CEO Scott believes there’s potential to commercialise the technology being used in the project with the prospect of working towards more efficient and advanced marine energy projects in the future. 

We believe pioneering our vision in the UK can deliver on a broad spectrum of political initiatives across net-zero, levelling up and building back better at the same time as demonstrating global leadership in the area of low carbon innovation that is essential to creating a more sustainable future for the generations to come.” 

The UK’s growing marine energy endeavours

This latest tidal turbine project isn’t a first for marine energy in the UK. The Port of London Authority permitted the River Thames to become a temporary home for trials into tidal energy technology and, more recently, a research project spanning the course of a year is set to focus on the potential tidal, wave, and floating wind technology holds for the future efficiency of renewable energy. The research is due to take place off of the Southwest coast of England on the Isles of Scilly

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