May 17, 2020

Does Your Business Have the Energy to Recycle?

green business
Going Green
Recycling
Adam Groff
Admin
3 min
Man holding earth
The June edition of Energy Digital is now live! By:AdamGroff Going green and saving green go hand in hand when it comes to businesses that recycle. Mos...

The June edition of Energy Digital is now live!

ByAdam Groff

Going green and saving green go hand in hand when it comes to businesses that recycle. Most businesses produce excess waste that is perfectly reusable, renewable, and recyclable.

How exactly are businesses saving money and the planet with their byproducts?

The Business of Recycling

Businesses large and small have a range of employees on staff each day and every employee adds to the amount of waste produced.

Considering most people recycle at home, if businesses consider themselves one big household, there’s no reason why they shouldn’t be recycling too. Restaurants, retail stores, and especially office buildings are all great candidates for recycling.

By simply putting a recycling bin next to the office printer or having a recycling container next to the dumpster, businesses can do their part to save the planet without really changing the way they do business.

The Benefits

Because the bottom dollar is always at the top of the list, businesses will love the cost effectiveness of recycling. Companies that recycle have lower waste removal fees and businesses that use recycled materials are eligible for government tax credits.

In addition, there are actually companies out there that pay businesses for their bulk paper and cardboard waste. Not only that, going green looks good for corporations and if they do it right, they might even be recognized with an eco-friendly business award.

Savings and public image aside, businesses that recycle are playing a huge role in saving the planet. If just a third of the major businesses in the world do their part to go paperless, recycle, and use recycled materials, it’s possible to cut world-wide waste by 10% a year.

Not only that, but businesses that are recycling their waste are also helping create jobs. Waste management is a growing industry and the recycling sector continues to grow with every aluminum can, glass bottle, and paper product recycled.

Read related content:

Recycling Programs

As stated before, every employee on staff adds to the amount of waste a company produces. And, according to the EPA, the average person produces 4.5 pounds of waste each day. That’s over one ton of solid waste a year.

By initiating workplace recycling and diversion programs, businesses can get their employees in the habit of recycling. In fact, businesses that have food-diversion programs in place cut 30% to 80% of their solid waste from ending up in landfills.

Businesses can get involved with workplace recycling programs in any number of ways. The most common way is by simply calling city waste management and having containers delivered and a pickup schedule arranged.

And, as for all those old desktop computers, fax machines, and company laptops, recycled electronics can either be dropped off at a recycling center or picked up at the office. Considering electronics sit in landfills for centuries, this is a recycling must.

When businesses do their part to recycle, it not only saves the planet, it saves money and creates new jobs.

Companies that haven’t already should try a greener approach to doing business.

About the Author: Adam Groff is a freelance writer and creator of content. He writes on a variety of topics including business improvement,online reputation management services, and green living.

 

 

 

 

 

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Oct 19, 2020

Itronics successfully tests manganese recovery process

cleantech
manganese
USA
Scott Birch
3 min
Nevada firm aims to become the primary manganese producer in the United States
Nevada firm aims to become the primary manganese producer in the United States...

Itronics - a Nevada-based emerging cleantech materials growth company that manufacturers fertilisers and produces silver - has successfully tested two proprietary processes that recover manganese, with one process recovering manganese, potassium and zinc from paste produced by processing non-rechargeable alkaline batteries. The second recovers manganese via the company’s Rock Kleen Technology.

Manganese, one of the four most important industrial metals and widely used by the steel industry, has been designated by the US Federal Government as a "critical mineral." It is a major component of non-rechargeable alkaline batteries, one of the largest battery categories sold globally.

The use of manganese in EV batteries is increasing as EV battery technology is shifting to use of more nickel and manganese in battery formulations. But according to the US Department of Interior, there is no mine production of manganese in the United States. As such, Itronics is using its Rock Kleen Technology to test metal recoverability from mine tailings obtained from a former silver mine in western Nevada that has a high manganese content. 

In a statement, Itronics says that its Rock Kleen process recovers silver, manganese, zinc, copper, lead and nickel. The company says that it has calculated – based on laboratory test results – that if a Rock Kleen tailings process is put into commercial production, the former mine site would become the only primary manganese producer in the United States.

Itronics adds that it has also tested non-rechargeable alkaline battery paste recovered by a large domestic battery recycling company to determine if it could use one of its hydrometallurgical processes to solubilize the manganese, potassium, and zinc contained in the paste. This testing was successful, and Itronics was able to produce material useable in two of its fertilisers, it says.

"We believe that the chemistry of the two recovery processes would lend itself to electrochemical recovery of the manganese, zinc, and other metals. At this time electrochemical recovery has been tested for zinc and copper,” says Dr John Whitney, Itronics president. 

“Itronics has been reviewing procedures for electrochemical recovery of manganese and plans to move this technology forward when it is appropriate to do so and has acquired electro-winning equipment needed to do that.

"Because of the two described proprietary technologies, Itronics is positioned to become a domestic manganese producer on a large scale to satisfy domestic demand. The actual manganese products have not yet been defined, except for use in the Company's GOLD'n GRO Multi-Nutrient Fertilisers. However, the Company believes that it will be able to produce chemical manganese products as well as electrochemical products," he adds.

Itronics’ research and development plant is located in Reno, about 40 miles west of the Tesla giga-factory. Its planned cleantech materials campus, which will be located approximately 40 miles south of the Tesla factory, would be the location where the manganese products would be produced.

Panasonic is operating one of the world's largest EV battery factories at the Tesla location. However, Tesla and other companies have announced that EV battery technology is shifting to use of nickel-manganese batteries. Itronics is positioned and located to become a Nevada-0based supplier of manganese products for battery manufacturing as its manganese recovery technologies are advanced, the company states.

A long-term objective for Itronics is to become a leading producer of high purity metals, including the U.S. critical metals manganese and tin, using the Company's breakthrough hydrometallurgy, pyrometallurgy, and electrochemical technologies. ‘Additionally, Itronics is strategically positioned with its portfolio of "Zero Waste Energy Saving Technologies" to help solve the recently declared emergency need for domestic production of Critical Minerals from materials located at mine sites,’ the statement continues.

The Company's growth forecast centers upon its 10-year business plan designed to integrate its Zero Waste Energy Saving Technologies and to grow annual sales from $2 million in 2019, to $113 million in 2025.

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