May 17, 2020

Global climate change research open to all

Admin
3 min
Indian wheat farmer who works with the research team
Created in partnership with the Mary Robinson Foundation, the Glasgow Caledonian University Climate Justice Resource Hub was launched at the Scottish G...

Created in partnership with the Mary Robinson Foundation, the Glasgow Caledonian University Climate Justice Resource Hub was launched at the Scottish Government’s International Conference on Climate Justice, held in Edinburgh’s Dynamic Earth on Wednesday, Oct. 9.

An audience of international businesses, civic society and leading thinkers from across the globe heard that the new resource hub will bring academia’s best and most influential research to a wider audience, including campaigners, teachers and charities.

“The need for this research repository has never been greater – the Hub is the first single portal through which good quality information and knowledge-based research can be accessed on the climate change agenda and in particular its social and economic impacts in developing countries,” said Professor Tahseen Jafry, who led the GCU team in creating the database.

“We have worked to make this important data available to a wide range of different groups. I hope users return to the hub many times, that it will spark new debates and partnerships, and that it will be used to underpin teaching and world-class research in the area of climate justice,” Jafry said.

Climate justice is based around the idea that the world’s most developed nations, who through centuries of high carbon emissions have contributed most to climate change, have a moral responsibility to help those less well developed nations who are experiencing the worst effects of the changing world climate, such as increasing numbers of famines and floods.

GCU honorary graduate, former UN high commissioner for Human Rights and former Irish president Dr. Mary Robinson first suggested the database after giving the university’s annual Magnusson Lecture in 2011. Her Mary Robinson Foundation - Climate Justice (MRFCJ) has supported the project since its inception. 

The new GCU Climate Justice Resource Hub is linked to a similar project, again supported by the MRFCJ, which stores and summarises all the climate justice research originating from Irish universities.

“I congratulate the GCU team on taking the lead in creating this very valuable repository for knowledge and reliable information on the very many complicated and intertwined issues arising from climate change and the need for an ethical approach to its impact on the developing world,” Robinson said. “I look forward to continued partnership and collaboration with the university in the furtherance of global understanding of this massively important challenge.”

Professor Pamela Gillies, principal and vice-chancellor of GCU, said: “GCU is privileged to partner with Dr. Mary Robinson and the expert team at her inspirational foundation, to produce a unique database on climate justice. This resource will help scholars and practitioners identify and harness effective solutions in this challenging arena.”

The GCU team selected and summarized 1,200 articles on a range of topics linked to climate justice, including strategies to deal with changing global temperatures, food security, gender and human rights.

The summaries will be free to access on a new website created by GCU (www.gcu.ac.uk/climatejustice), ensuring that the debate around climate change, and climate justice, is supported by the highest quality available evidence.

The team systematically reviewed existing literature to identify and profile peer-reviewed and published research, using the same system to select the papers as is used to create the world’s most prestigious medical research libraries.
 

Photo credit: Nimisha Mittal 

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Oct 19, 2020

Itronics successfully tests manganese recovery process

cleantech
manganese
USA
Scott Birch
3 min
Nevada firm aims to become the primary manganese producer in the United States
Nevada firm aims to become the primary manganese producer in the United States...

Itronics - a Nevada-based emerging cleantech materials growth company that manufacturers fertilisers and produces silver - has successfully tested two proprietary processes that recover manganese, with one process recovering manganese, potassium and zinc from paste produced by processing non-rechargeable alkaline batteries. The second recovers manganese via the company’s Rock Kleen Technology.

Manganese, one of the four most important industrial metals and widely used by the steel industry, has been designated by the US Federal Government as a "critical mineral." It is a major component of non-rechargeable alkaline batteries, one of the largest battery categories sold globally.

The use of manganese in EV batteries is increasing as EV battery technology is shifting to use of more nickel and manganese in battery formulations. But according to the US Department of Interior, there is no mine production of manganese in the United States. As such, Itronics is using its Rock Kleen Technology to test metal recoverability from mine tailings obtained from a former silver mine in western Nevada that has a high manganese content. 

In a statement, Itronics says that its Rock Kleen process recovers silver, manganese, zinc, copper, lead and nickel. The company says that it has calculated – based on laboratory test results – that if a Rock Kleen tailings process is put into commercial production, the former mine site would become the only primary manganese producer in the United States.

Itronics adds that it has also tested non-rechargeable alkaline battery paste recovered by a large domestic battery recycling company to determine if it could use one of its hydrometallurgical processes to solubilize the manganese, potassium, and zinc contained in the paste. This testing was successful, and Itronics was able to produce material useable in two of its fertilisers, it says.

"We believe that the chemistry of the two recovery processes would lend itself to electrochemical recovery of the manganese, zinc, and other metals. At this time electrochemical recovery has been tested for zinc and copper,” says Dr John Whitney, Itronics president. 

“Itronics has been reviewing procedures for electrochemical recovery of manganese and plans to move this technology forward when it is appropriate to do so and has acquired electro-winning equipment needed to do that.

"Because of the two described proprietary technologies, Itronics is positioned to become a domestic manganese producer on a large scale to satisfy domestic demand. The actual manganese products have not yet been defined, except for use in the Company's GOLD'n GRO Multi-Nutrient Fertilisers. However, the Company believes that it will be able to produce chemical manganese products as well as electrochemical products," he adds.

Itronics’ research and development plant is located in Reno, about 40 miles west of the Tesla giga-factory. Its planned cleantech materials campus, which will be located approximately 40 miles south of the Tesla factory, would be the location where the manganese products would be produced.

Panasonic is operating one of the world's largest EV battery factories at the Tesla location. However, Tesla and other companies have announced that EV battery technology is shifting to use of nickel-manganese batteries. Itronics is positioned and located to become a Nevada-0based supplier of manganese products for battery manufacturing as its manganese recovery technologies are advanced, the company states.

A long-term objective for Itronics is to become a leading producer of high purity metals, including the U.S. critical metals manganese and tin, using the Company's breakthrough hydrometallurgy, pyrometallurgy, and electrochemical technologies. ‘Additionally, Itronics is strategically positioned with its portfolio of "Zero Waste Energy Saving Technologies" to help solve the recently declared emergency need for domestic production of Critical Minerals from materials located at mine sites,’ the statement continues.

The Company's growth forecast centers upon its 10-year business plan designed to integrate its Zero Waste Energy Saving Technologies and to grow annual sales from $2 million in 2019, to $113 million in 2025.

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