May 17, 2020

Latin America biofuels highlighted

Admin
3 min
Biofuels in Latin America
What are the major issues facing Latin Americas burgeoning biofuels market? What impact will EU and U.S. policies have on millers and producers?What ca...

What are the major issues facing Latin America’s burgeoning biofuels market? What impact will EU and U.S. policies have on millers and producers? What can investors expect from the Latin American market? Apart from Brazil, who are the movers and shakers in Latin American ethanol production and what do they think about the future? These questions and more will be addressed at the third annual F.O. Licht’s Ethanol Latin America conference in early December.

F.O. Licht’s Third Annual Ethanol Latin America conference will be held Dec. 2-4 at the InterContinental Hotel in Cali, Columbia. This completely unique event focuses on the prospects and pressures facing the fast-growing Latin American ethanol producers and their markets. A host of top-level speakers will share their insights and views on the region’s production and potential and attendees will be given access to information on all aspects of the market.

“Latin America is seeing new capacity build with countries such as Colombia, Panama, Peru and Mexico all attracting new investments in biofuels,” says Michael Grech, F.O. Licht.

This year’s Ethanol Latin America is taking place at a time when new mandates, a push for higher blends and new trading opportunities are opening up across Central and South America.

“Latin America is also ideal for 2G ethanol as it can use the bagasse and other waste from sugarcane and convert it into cellulosic ethanol,” Grech says. “This is the way forward and we will be seeing new plants being built to produce 2G ethanol. Countries in Latin America such as Colombia are also looking at increasing their blending mandate which should also result in new investments in the region.”

Colombian potential

Colombia has huge potential for producing biofuels,” said Johan Martinez, director of Renewable Energy and New Business from sugarcane producers association Asocaña, who is one of the key speakers at F.O. Licht’s Ethanol Latin America conference.

There is plenty of land available (more than five million hectares) that is suitable for sugarcane production. The government has to give clear signals of stability to the investors in order to develop this potential. Those new areas that can be planted include land currently dedicated to cattle raising, which will have to be conditioned to agriculture.”

Martinez also sees strong potential for cellulosic ethanol production in Colombia for the future. “Cellulosic ethanol is the next step for domestic sugarcane producers. There is plenty availability of biomass that can be converted into ethanol. The development of this production will depend on the availability and the cost of implementation of such technologies,” Martinez says.

A panel of top-level industry experts will join Martinez at  F.O. Licht’s Ethanol Latin America, including: Benito Lopez Martinez, director of BIOMEX; Alzbeta Klein, director at the IFC; Martin Fraguio, executive director of MAIZAR; and Djalma Teixeira De Lima Filho, president at Riopaila Castilla among many others.

Ethanol Latin America Conference has been designed to give attendees an opportunity to meet, network and do business with decision-makers from across Latin America. This event is the only ethanol and biofuels event that focuses on what is happening in countries such as Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Mexico and Argentina.

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Jul 30, 2021

Major move forward for UK’s nascent marine energy sector

marineenergy
renewableenergy
tidalturbine
Sustainability
3 min
The UK’s nascent marine energy sector starts exporting electricity to the grid as the most powerful tidal turbine in the world begins to generate power

Although the industry is small and the technologies are limited, marine-based energy systems look to be taking off as “the world’s most powerful tidal turbine” begins grid-connected power generation at the European Marine Energy Centre

At around 74 metres long, the turbine single-handedly holds the potential to supply the annual electricity demand to approximately 2,000 homes within the UK and offset 2,200 tonnes of CO2 per year.

Orbital Marine Power, a privately held Scottish-based company, announced the turbine is set to operate for around 15 years in the waters surrounding Orkney, Scotland, where the 2-megawatt O2 turbine weighing around 680 metric tons will be linked to a local on-land electricity network via a subsea cable. 

How optimistic is the outlook for the UK’s turbine bid?

Described as a “major milestone for O2” by CEO of Orbital Marine Power Andrew Scott, the turbine will also supply additional power to generate ‘green hydrogen’ through the use of a land-based electrolyser in the hopes it will demonstrate the “decarbonisation of wider energy requirements.” 

“Our vision is that this project is the trigger to the harnessing of tidal stream resources around the world to play a role in tackling climate change whilst creating a new, low-carbon industrial sector,” says Scott in a statement. 

The Scottish Government has awarded £3.4 million through the Saltire Tidal Energy Challenge Fund to support the project’s construction, while public lenders also contributed to the financial requirements of the tidal turbine through the ethical investment platform Abundance Investment.

“The deployment of Orbital Marine Power’s O2, the world’s most powerful tidal turbine, is a proud moment for Scotland and a significant milestone in our journey to net zero,” says Michael Matheson, the Cabinet Secretary for Net-Zero, Energy and Transport for the Scottish Government. 

“With our abundant natural resources, expertise and ambition, Scotland is ideally placed to harness the enormous global market for marine energy whilst helping deliver a net-zero economy.

“That’s why the Scottish Government has consistently supported the marine energy sector for over 10 years.”

However, Orbital Marine CEO Scott believes there’s potential to commercialise the technology being used in the project with the prospect of working towards more efficient and advanced marine energy projects in the future. 

We believe pioneering our vision in the UK can deliver on a broad spectrum of political initiatives across net-zero, levelling up and building back better at the same time as demonstrating global leadership in the area of low carbon innovation that is essential to creating a more sustainable future for the generations to come.” 

The UK’s growing marine energy endeavours

This latest tidal turbine project isn’t a first for marine energy in the UK. The Port of London Authority permitted the River Thames to become a temporary home for trials into tidal energy technology and, more recently, a research project spanning the course of a year is set to focus on the potential tidal, wave, and floating wind technology holds for the future efficiency of renewable energy. The research is due to take place off of the Southwest coast of England on the Isles of Scilly

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