May 17, 2020

Michael Jackson Photos may Solve Energy Crisis

Michael Jackson
generator
Energy
free
Admin
3 min
Michael Jackson photographer, Reginald Garcia, sells rare photos to fund an electric generator he thinks can solve the energy crisis
The “King of Pop,” Michael Jackson, is probably the last person anyone would expect to solve the world energy crisis. But Jacksons songs o...

 

The “King of Pop,” Michael Jackson, is probably the last person anyone would expect to solve the world energy crisis.  But Jackson’s songs often reflect a yearning to make the world a better place, and following his recent death, a former Jackson photographer may help the pop star achieve that goal posthumously.  Reginald Garcia—a photographer who captured images of Jackson in his youth (over 33 years ago)—has developed an electric motor/generator he claims produces more energy than is put into it.  He plans to sell unpublished photos of Michael Jackson and his brothers to raise funds for the new energy device.

Garcia’s photos reveal a young 19-year-old Michael Jackson and his brothers at a video shoot in a Hollywood studio in March 1978.  The photos are a rare glimpse at Jackson just prior to when he began transforming his appearance with plastic surgery.  Garcia has 130 of said photos and is in the appraisal process now to prepare them for sale. 

Garcia plans to use the funds to continue testing his motor/generator and prepare the design for commercial sale.  Devices such as this have been developed before, but have had little commercial success.  The reason is that the very concept of a device creating more energy than is put into it defies the laws of physics as they are understood today.  But frankly, some of the most revolutionary breakthroughs in history were mocked as impossible prior to their proliferation.  

SEE OTHER TOP STORIES IN THE WDM CONTENT NETWORK

CERAWeek 2011 in Review: Natural Gas the Solution to Oil Shortfall
Mining Helium-3 will Transform the Dark Side of the Moon

Types of Biofuels: Ethanol, Biodiesel, Biobutanol, and the Companies that Make Them

READ THIS MONTH’S ISSUE OF ENERGY DIGITAL!

Two previously created devices in particular come to mind when discussing the idea proposed by Garcia.  The “Overunity” motor is a magnetic motor developed and perfected many times over by hobbyist inventors.  It is named as such because for every unit of energy input into the device, it produces more energy output.  A second device is the “Schoolgirl Motor” invented by John Bedini, which essentially operates on the same kind of principle.  However, both of these devices have been downgraded by Big Science due to their direct opposition to the accepted laws of physics, and thus have never become commercially viable. 

While Reginald Garcia may not be the first to invent such a device, if he could be the first to actually bring it to market that in itself would be revolutionary.  The idea of producing clean, cheap, abundant energy may seem like a no-brainer, but do not forget that the energy sector is the most profitable industry in the world, and there’s nothing profitable about cheap energy.  That is why ideas like this tend to be buried.  It would be very exciting and such a wonderful tribute to Michael Jackson—who has brought joy to the world through his music in spite of his marred private life—to help bring about a revolution in energy generation.  If Garcia’s rare photos can bring in enough starting capital, then who knows, he may just make it happen! 

OVERUNITY GENERATOR

 

JOHN BEDINI "SCHOOLGIRL" MOTOR

Share article

Jul 30, 2021

Major move forward for UK’s nascent marine energy sector

marineenergy
renewableenergy
tidalturbine
Sustainability
3 min
The UK’s nascent marine energy sector starts exporting electricity to the grid as the most powerful tidal turbine in the world begins to generate power

Although the industry is small and the technologies are limited, marine-based energy systems look to be taking off as “the world’s most powerful tidal turbine” begins grid-connected power generation at the European Marine Energy Centre

At around 74 metres long, the turbine single-handedly holds the potential to supply the annual electricity demand to approximately 2,000 homes within the UK and offset 2,200 tonnes of CO2 per year.

Orbital Marine Power, a privately held Scottish-based company, announced the turbine is set to operate for around 15 years in the waters surrounding Orkney, Scotland, where the 2-megawatt O2 turbine weighing around 680 metric tons will be linked to a local on-land electricity network via a subsea cable. 

How optimistic is the outlook for the UK’s turbine bid?

Described as a “major milestone for O2” by CEO of Orbital Marine Power Andrew Scott, the turbine will also supply additional power to generate ‘green hydrogen’ through the use of a land-based electrolyser in the hopes it will demonstrate the “decarbonisation of wider energy requirements.” 

“Our vision is that this project is the trigger to the harnessing of tidal stream resources around the world to play a role in tackling climate change whilst creating a new, low-carbon industrial sector,” says Scott in a statement. 

The Scottish Government has awarded £3.4 million through the Saltire Tidal Energy Challenge Fund to support the project’s construction, while public lenders also contributed to the financial requirements of the tidal turbine through the ethical investment platform Abundance Investment.

“The deployment of Orbital Marine Power’s O2, the world’s most powerful tidal turbine, is a proud moment for Scotland and a significant milestone in our journey to net zero,” says Michael Matheson, the Cabinet Secretary for Net-Zero, Energy and Transport for the Scottish Government. 

“With our abundant natural resources, expertise and ambition, Scotland is ideally placed to harness the enormous global market for marine energy whilst helping deliver a net-zero economy.

“That’s why the Scottish Government has consistently supported the marine energy sector for over 10 years.”

However, Orbital Marine CEO Scott believes there’s potential to commercialise the technology being used in the project with the prospect of working towards more efficient and advanced marine energy projects in the future. 

We believe pioneering our vision in the UK can deliver on a broad spectrum of political initiatives across net-zero, levelling up and building back better at the same time as demonstrating global leadership in the area of low carbon innovation that is essential to creating a more sustainable future for the generations to come.” 

The UK’s growing marine energy endeavours

This latest tidal turbine project isn’t a first for marine energy in the UK. The Port of London Authority permitted the River Thames to become a temporary home for trials into tidal energy technology and, more recently, a research project spanning the course of a year is set to focus on the potential tidal, wave, and floating wind technology holds for the future efficiency of renewable energy. The research is due to take place off of the Southwest coast of England on the Isles of Scilly

Share article