May 17, 2020

Out with the Old, in with the New

energy digital
Samsung
Canada
Electronics
Admin
3 min
Ten million Canadians to gift electronics this year
Although almost 10 million Canadians (28%) say they are likely to gift new electronics this holiday season, the concept of "out with the old, in...

 

Although almost 10 million Canadians (28%) say they are likely to gift new electronics this holiday season, the concept of "out with the old, in with the new" isn't being closely followed. A recent Samsung Canada survey revealed that many Canadians may not know what to do with their old electronics or e-waste; 1 in 3 respondents (35%) say their old electronics are just gathering dust stored in their homes, while 1 in 10 admit to throwing their e-waste into the garbage. E-waste can contain hazardous materials and presents special challenges when it comes to end-of-life disposal.

"Almost 10 million Canadians are likely to give electronic gifts this holiday season, but at the same time, we're seeing that close to the same number of Canadians may not know what to do with old electronics," said Andrew Barrett, VP Marketing for Samsung Canada. "Samsung is passionate about e-waste recycling, so this holiday season as Canadians unwrap new electronics, we want to remind everyone about its importance."

After the last pieces of gift wrapping paper have settled post-holidays, take the time to round up those old or obsolete electronics for responsible recycling. The Samsung Recycling Direct program offers more than 40 convenient year-round e-waste drop-off depots across Canada. In 2012, Samsung helped recycle more than 1.3 million pounds of e-waste across the country.

Visit samsung.com/hopeforchildren for a list of Samsung Recycling Direct depot locations across Canada.

Other interesting trends revealed from the survey include:

  • Men are more likely than women to give electronics as gifts this holiday season (33% of men vs 24% of women)

  • BC and Alberta residents are most likely to give electronics as gifts (both provinces at 32% vs 28% national average)

  • Albertans are most likely to store their old e-waste at home (45% vs. 35% national average)

  • Respondents age 18-34 were most likely to give electronics as gifts (32% vs. 28% national average) and to store old e-waste at home (54% vs. 35% national average)

  • BC residents are most likely to recycle their e-waste (63% vs. 48% national average)

About the Survey

From December 11th to December 12th 2012 an online survey was conducted among 1,004 randomly selected Canadian adults who are Angus Reid Forum panelists. The margin of error-which measures sampling variability-is +/- 3.1%, 19 times out of 20. The results have been statistically weighted according to the most current education, age, gender and region (and in Quebec language) Census data to ensure a sample representative of the entire adult population of Canada. Discrepancies in or between totals are due to rounding. The estimates of the total number of Canadians noted are a percentage of the current population, corresponding to the survey results.

 

SOURCE Samsung Electronics Canada Inc.

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Oct 19, 2020

Itronics successfully tests manganese recovery process

cleantech
manganese
USA
Scott Birch
3 min
Nevada firm aims to become the primary manganese producer in the United States
Nevada firm aims to become the primary manganese producer in the United States...

Itronics - a Nevada-based emerging cleantech materials growth company that manufacturers fertilisers and produces silver - has successfully tested two proprietary processes that recover manganese, with one process recovering manganese, potassium and zinc from paste produced by processing non-rechargeable alkaline batteries. The second recovers manganese via the company’s Rock Kleen Technology.

Manganese, one of the four most important industrial metals and widely used by the steel industry, has been designated by the US Federal Government as a "critical mineral." It is a major component of non-rechargeable alkaline batteries, one of the largest battery categories sold globally.

The use of manganese in EV batteries is increasing as EV battery technology is shifting to use of more nickel and manganese in battery formulations. But according to the US Department of Interior, there is no mine production of manganese in the United States. As such, Itronics is using its Rock Kleen Technology to test metal recoverability from mine tailings obtained from a former silver mine in western Nevada that has a high manganese content. 

In a statement, Itronics says that its Rock Kleen process recovers silver, manganese, zinc, copper, lead and nickel. The company says that it has calculated – based on laboratory test results – that if a Rock Kleen tailings process is put into commercial production, the former mine site would become the only primary manganese producer in the United States.

Itronics adds that it has also tested non-rechargeable alkaline battery paste recovered by a large domestic battery recycling company to determine if it could use one of its hydrometallurgical processes to solubilize the manganese, potassium, and zinc contained in the paste. This testing was successful, and Itronics was able to produce material useable in two of its fertilisers, it says.

"We believe that the chemistry of the two recovery processes would lend itself to electrochemical recovery of the manganese, zinc, and other metals. At this time electrochemical recovery has been tested for zinc and copper,” says Dr John Whitney, Itronics president. 

“Itronics has been reviewing procedures for electrochemical recovery of manganese and plans to move this technology forward when it is appropriate to do so and has acquired electro-winning equipment needed to do that.

"Because of the two described proprietary technologies, Itronics is positioned to become a domestic manganese producer on a large scale to satisfy domestic demand. The actual manganese products have not yet been defined, except for use in the Company's GOLD'n GRO Multi-Nutrient Fertilisers. However, the Company believes that it will be able to produce chemical manganese products as well as electrochemical products," he adds.

Itronics’ research and development plant is located in Reno, about 40 miles west of the Tesla giga-factory. Its planned cleantech materials campus, which will be located approximately 40 miles south of the Tesla factory, would be the location where the manganese products would be produced.

Panasonic is operating one of the world's largest EV battery factories at the Tesla location. However, Tesla and other companies have announced that EV battery technology is shifting to use of nickel-manganese batteries. Itronics is positioned and located to become a Nevada-0based supplier of manganese products for battery manufacturing as its manganese recovery technologies are advanced, the company states.

A long-term objective for Itronics is to become a leading producer of high purity metals, including the U.S. critical metals manganese and tin, using the Company's breakthrough hydrometallurgy, pyrometallurgy, and electrochemical technologies. ‘Additionally, Itronics is strategically positioned with its portfolio of "Zero Waste Energy Saving Technologies" to help solve the recently declared emergency need for domestic production of Critical Minerals from materials located at mine sites,’ the statement continues.

The Company's growth forecast centers upon its 10-year business plan designed to integrate its Zero Waste Energy Saving Technologies and to grow annual sales from $2 million in 2019, to $113 million in 2025.

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