Feb 10, 2020

All Unilever operations now run on 100% renewable electricity

Marcus Lawrence
2 min
Unilever has been sourcing electricity from 100% renewable sources since 1 January across its global operations
British-Dutch manufacturing giant Unilever has made the switch to 100% renewable grid electricity for its entire value chain: facto...

British-Dutch manufacturing giant Unilever has made the switch to 100% renewable grid electricity for its entire value chain: factories, offices, R&D facilities, data centres, warehouses and distribution centres.

The firm completed the shift on 1 January 2020, and has announced since that it supplements grid power with on-site solar installations at sites across 23 countries. In a 4 February statement, Unilever said it will now turn its attention to sourcing the entirety of its energy needs from renewable sources. It added in the same statement that 24 of its sites around the world are already 100% carbon neutral, with the goal of company-wide carbon neutrality by 2030.

“Through our partnership with Unilever, we will potentially be generating about three million units of energy every year. That’s the equivalent of planting nearly five thousand trees,” said Anuvrat Joshi, Business Development Director at Cleantech Solar, one of Unilever's Indian power suppliers.

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Unilever has in recent times positioned itself as a sustainability champion. Last June, the firm announced that 75% of its overall turnover growth in 2018 came from its ‘Sustainable Living’ brands (including Dove, Persil, SUre, Hellmann’s and more), highlighting the prescience of its strategy in the area. 

Outside its energy strategy, the company announced in October that it is undertaking a rigorous new approach to its packaging methods in a bid to develop a circular economy. 

“Plastic has its place, but that place is not in the environment. We can only eliminate plastic waste by acting fast and taking radical action at all points in the plastic cycle,” said Alan Jope, CEO at Unilever, in the firm’s press release at the time.

“Our starting point has to be design, reducing the amount of plastic we use, and then making sure that what we do use increasingly comes from recycled sources. We are also committed to ensuring all our plastic packaging is reusable, recyclable or compostable.

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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