Sep 16, 2013

Energy Network's Use of DMS Grows

Admin
2 min
Serving as the user interface to critical distribution infrastructure, distribution management systems (DMSs) increasingly form the brains of the e...

Serving as the user interface to critical distribution infrastructure, distribution management systems (DMSs) increasingly form the brains of the energy distribution network, supporting all aspects of utility power grid operations.

Information technology (IT) upgrades, following in the wake of smart grid equipment rollouts, are driving steady growth for these third-generation DMSs.  According to a recent report from Navigant Research, the number of electric meters served by DMS-equipped substations will reach 775 million in 2020. 

“The underlying operational benefits of increased reliability and cost-effective optimization are contributing to advances in the DMS market,” says Kristoffer Torvik, senior research analyst with Navigant Research. “Operators can focus on keeping the lights on, storms that cause overwhelming outages are more manageable, and line workers and outage crew are kept safe.”

While some of the leading DMS providers are well-established leaders in the power and automation industry, others are IT pure plays that have challenged and influenced the thought process of the utility industry. In just the past two years, according to the report, the influence these more specialized firms have had on the smart grid sector has led to several $1 billion-plus acquisitions of IT/operational technology companies.

The report, “Distribution Management Systems”, analyzes the global market trends for full advanced DMS, intermediate DMS, and light DMS solutions. The report provides a roadmap for DMS technology, along with a comprehensive assessment of the demand drivers, business models, policy factors, and technology issues associated with this diverse and dynamic market.

Key industry players are profiled in depth, and worldwide revenue forecasts, segmented by deployment type and region, extend through 2020. An Executive Summary of the report is available for free download on the Navigant Research website.

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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