Jan 3, 2019

Geminor: landmark RDF shipment reaches Scandinavia

Waste-to-Energy
Recycling
Andrew Woods
2 min
Energy Digital reports on landmark RDF shipment
Norwegian recycling company Geminor has become the first to handle a shipment of Refuse-Derived Fuel (RDF) f...

Norwegian recycling company Geminor has become the first to handle a shipment of Refuse-Derived Fuel (RDF) from Italy to Denmark.

A ship carrying Refuse-Derived Fuel from Italy has reached port in Sjelland, Denmark to mark the test shipment between the two countries. The shipment, consisting of 2 369 tonnes of sorted household waste RDF from Naples, is the first ever waste fuels export from Italy to the Scandinavian market.

Until now, countries surrounding the Mediterranean has not been a priority to Geminor. However, in a constantly changing market it is important to consider and test several alternative suppliers outside northern Europe.

See also:

Volvo’s new vehicles will be made from 25% recycle plastic

Apple updates its recycling robot for Earth Day

Nestlé pledges to make all its packaging recyclable or reusable by 2025

Since its formation in 2004, Geminor has continued to experience international growth. Now considered a leading player in the European secondary fuels market, the company handles more than 1,4 million tonnes of feedstock every year and holds contracts with more than 80 waste-to-energy facilities.

Chief Operating Officer at Geminor, Ralf Schöpwinkel said: “Geminor is the first to implement RDF delivery from Italy to Scandinavia, and we are happy to see that the first project has been successful. The quality of the logistics process has been high and the public waste company in Naples has delivered good quality bales.”

“The UK marked has delivered secondary fuels to off-takers in the Nordics for some time now, but with Brexit coming there are uncertainties regarding the future flow of RDF. At present the Italians have a big surplus of household waste, and the nearest off-takers are currently found in the Nordics. That makes Italy a market we will continue to develop in the future.”

 

 

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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