GETI 2019: renewables reaping rewards of smart skills strategies

By Andrew Woods
Renewables businesses’ strategic approach to talent investment is paying dividends according to the thi...

Renewables businesses’ strategic approach to talent investment is paying dividends according to the third annual Global Energy Talent Index (GETI).

The report by Airswift, the global workforce solutions provider for the energy, process and infrastructure sectors, and Energy Jobline, the world’s leading jobsite for the energy and engineering industries, indicates that renewables remains the most popular destination for talent in other energy sectors who are looking for a change. Furthermore, there is little regret among those making the plunge. When asked whether they would pursue a career in the sector if they were entering the energy industry now, 78% of renewables professionals said yes, with 85% of those aged 25 and under expressing their enthusiasm.”

The report went on to warn that renewables companies cannot afford to become complacent. “Forty-six per cent of sector professionals are worried about an impending talent emergency in the sector. Indeed, 30% believe the crisis has already hit and a further 29% expect it within the next five years. This concern escalates among the young, with 54% of those aged under 25 expressing worry, against just 40% of those aged 55 or over.

Airswift and Energy Jobline surveyed more than 17,000 energy professionals and hiring managers in 162 countries across five industry sub-sectors: oil and gas, renewables, power, nuclear and petrochemicals. The report is available to download at http://www.getireport.com/download-report.

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Janette Marx, Chief Executive Officer at Airswift said: “In recent years, GETI has proven hugely successful at providing hiring managers with the insights they need to manage the expectations of the energy workforce. This year is no exception, as we respond to what they told us was their biggest concern: the energy skills gap.

“And the renewables chapter makes for interesting reading. In many ways, the sector has led the way in embracing digitalisation to cultivate a happy workforce and attract talent from other sectors. Yet younger professionals remain very worried about the future. They entered this sector because they wanted to see change and are nervous that they’re not seeing it fast enough.”

Hannah Peet, Managing Director at Energy Jobline said: “Competition between sectors remains as fierce as ever, and renewables companies need to be careful that their successes don’t breed complacency.

“However, hiring managers expect to start paying out a lot more raises next year, perhaps because they see exactly the retention challenge the sector faces. Hopefully, that foresight will be a saving grace because there are a lot of positives for them to build on.”

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