Nov 19, 2013

GM plant to use renewable energy

Admin
2 min
General Motors and Detroit Renewable Energy (DRE) have agreed on a renewable energy project to turn solid municipal waste from Metro Detr...

General Motors and Detroit Renewable Energy (DRE) have agreed on a renewable energy project to turn solid municipal waste from Metro Detroit into process steam that will be used to heat and cool portions of GM's Detroit-Hamtramck assembly plant.

When the project is operational, 58 percent of the plant's energy needs will come from renewable energy, making Detroit-Hamtramck the top GM facility in the world by percentage of renewable energy used.

"We have 107 landfill-free facilities across the globe that recycle or reuse their waste, with some of it turned into energy," said Rob Threlkeld, GM's global manager of renewable energy. "It made sense to explore this option with DRE at Detroit-Hamtramck, given their quality work in helping us manage our energy use at some of our other GM plants."

Detroit Renewable is able to process more than one million tons of municipal solid waste into electric power and steam while also recycling nearly 40,000 tons of metal annually.

The steam will travel 8,300 feet through a pipe originating at Detroit Renewable Power and ending at the Detroit-Hamtramck plant.

Read more about waste to energy solutions: 

Global waste to energy market growing

Energy from waste heat a valuable commodity

Covanta Energy - an energy from waste company 

"We have a long history of working with GM in providing energy to its assembly plants," said Detroit Renewable Energy Chairman and CEO Steven White. "To incorporate a sustainable and renewable energy source into the Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly Plant adds real value to the value chain."

The steam pipe will provide 15.8 megawatts of renewable energy to the plant, which equates to 12 percent of GM's overall goal of putting 125 megawatts of renewable energy into its energy portfolio by 2020.

Construction of the new steam line and associated energy infrastructure will begin later this month and become operational next spring.

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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