May 28, 2013

Innotech Solar Demands Anti-Dumping on Chinese PV panels

China
Admin
2 min
  The Scandinavian-German manufacturer Innotech Solar (ITS) is demanding the enforcement of anti-dumping duties for Chinese solar mod...

 

The Scandinavian-German manufacturer Innotech Solar (ITS) is demanding the enforcement of anti-dumping duties for Chinese solar modules. This has been prompted by Chinese manufacturers selling their photovoltaic modules below their production costs in order to undercut European competitors. In the event that the European solar industry falls, Chinese prices would rise significantly. 



“A glance at the annual financial statements of Chinese suppliers shows that instead of economizing, these companies are simply selling their PV modules below manufacturing costs. In some instances, their losses are just as high as their sales,” explains Dr. Thomas Hillig, Vice President Module Sales & Marketing at Innotech Solar. “If Chinese manufacturers were not selling their modules at levels that distort the competition, their prices would actually be up to double as high.”



According to Hillig, as soon as Europe loses its own photovoltaics industry, Chinese manufacturers would no longer provide their solar modules at unprofitable prices. “Fair competition is only possible if all market players follow the same set of game rules. We are in no doubt that China is distorting the market for PV modules by dumping its products in a targeted manner and this unfair competition must not remain unpunished by the EU,” continues Hillig. “If we do not act now to enforce anti-dumping duties that bring about a discernible increase in prices, Chinese suppliers will dramatically increase their module prices once the European competition has collapsed.” 



Innotech Solar’s business model boasts an innovative production process that brings about cost benefits. The company’s in-house research teams have developed a process that economically restores the performance of low-efficiency solar cells to their full capacity by using thermal imaging to detect low-performing cell areas and automatically isolating them with special lasers.

The company optimizes solar cells from different manufacturers in the German city of Halle an der Saale and manufactures all of its modules in Glava, Sweden. Apart from its EVA film, which it obtains from the Japanese market leader for this material, Innotech Solar only uses components from European manufacturers of proprietary products. A multitude of tests by independent experts, such as the Fraunhofer Institute, Photovoltaik-Institut Berlin or PV Lab, have demonstrated the high performance, longevity and positive environmental impact of Innotech Solar modules.


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Jun 7, 2021

Trafigura and Yara International explore clean ammonia usage

Shipping
fuel
Decarbonisation
ammonia
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Commodity trading company Trafigura and Yara International sign MoU to explore developing ammonia as a clean fuel in shipping

Independent commodity trading company Trafigura and Yara International have signed an MoU to explore developing ammonia as a clean fuel in shipping and ammonia fuel infrastructure.

Reducing shipping emissions is a vital component of the fight against global climate change, yet Greenhouse Gas emissions from the global maritime sector are increasing - and at odds with the IMO's strategy to cut absolute emissions by at least 50% by 2050. 

How more than 70,000 ships can decrease their reliance on carbon-based sources is one of transport's most pressing decarbonisation challenges.

Yara and Trafigura intend to collaborate on initiatives that will establish themselves in the clean ammonia value chain. Under the MoU announced today, Trafigura and Yara intend to work together in the following areas:

  • The supply of clean ammonia by Yara to Trafigura Group companies
  • Exploration of joint R&D initiatives for clean ammonia application as a marine fuel
  • Development of new clean ammonia assets including marine fuel infrastructure and market opportunities

Magnus Krogh Ankarstrand, President of Yara Clean Ammonia, said the agreement is a good example of cross-industry collaboration to develop and promote zero-emission fuel in the form of clean ammonia for the shipping industry. "Building clean ammonia value chains is critical to facilitate the transition to zero emission fuels by enabling the hydrogen economy – not least within trade and distribution where both Yara and Trafigura have leading capabilities. Demand and supply of clean ammonia need to be developed in tandem," he said.  

There is a growing consensus that hydrogen-based fuels will ultimately be the shipping fuels of the future, but clear and comprehensive regulation is essential, according to Jose Maria Larocca, Executive Director and Co-Head of Oil Trading for Trafigura.

Ammonia has a number of properties that require "further investigation," according to Wartsila. "It ignites and burns poorly compared to other fuels and is toxic and corrosive, making safe handling and storage important. Burning ammonia could also lead to higher NOx emissions unless controlled either by aftertreatment or by optimising the combustion process," it notes.

Trafigura has co-sponsored the R&D of MAN Energy Solutions’ ammonia-fuelled engine for maritime vessels, has performed in-depth studies of transport fuels with reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and has published a white paper on the need for a global carbon levy for shipping fuels to be introduced by International Maritime Organization.

Oslo-based Yara produces roughly 8.5 million tonnes of ammonia annually and employs a fleet of 11 ammonia carriers, including 5 fully owned ships, and owns 18 marine ammonia terminals with 580 kt of storage capacity – enabling it to produce and deliver ammonia across the globe.

It recently established a new clean ammonia unit to capture growth opportunities in emission-free fuel for shipping and power, carbon-free fertilizer and ammonia for industrial applications.

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