Apr 12, 2017

KarTent and Smurfit Kappa help reduce festival waste with cardboard tents

Waste Management
Recycling
Nell Walker
2 min
KarTent and Smurfit Kappa help reduce festival waste with cardboard tents
KarTent and Smurfit Kappa have won a prestigious global product design a...

KarTent and Smurfit Kappa have won a prestigious global product design award for an eco-friendly tent the pair has designed.

The internationally-renowned Red Dot Awards honoured the two companies’ innovative design for a ground-breaking cardboard tent. Entries from over 40 countries were considered, but KarTent's design won out, sitting alongside former winners like Apple, Dyson, Rolls-Royce, and Samsonite.

Two young Dutch entrepreneurs created the tent as a solution to the fact that hundreds of festival-goers abandon their tents in fields every year, which creates an enormous amount of unrecyclable waste. Paper-based packaging leader Smurfit Kappa stepped in to help the duo turn their design into a tangible product, with a fully cardboard tent which is as convenient as it is eco-friendly.

What about rain?, you may ask. Well, the tent can absorb up to 400 percent of its own weight in water due to the structure of the cardboard, retaining its integrity even in the wettest conditions. It is also more energy-efficient in production, emitting only half the amount of carbon dioxide of a traditional tend, and is completely recyclable after use.

Jan Portheine, co-founder of KarTent, said: “Being passionate about both music and the environment, I wanted to find a way to make the festival experience more eco-friendly. Working with Smurfit Kappa made it possible to achieve an impossible mission - being able to produce such a unique product. We could never have unlocked the full potential of KarTent without Smurfit Kappa’s input and we’re very proud to see our creation recognised by Red Dot.”

Arco Berkenbosch, Vice President of Innovation and Development, Smurfit Kappa said: “Red Dot recognises the very best in design so we are honoured that this collaboration has won one of their prestigious product awards. It’s a welcome addition to the six Red Dot Communications Design Awards we’re proud to have already won. Finding solutions to complex challenges is an opportunity we relish at Smurfit Kappa and the KarTent is a prime example of how innovation and sustainability can work together to create something truly exceptional. The team in our Van Dam Plant really enjoys working with KarTent on this product.”

This is the seventh time Smurfit Kappa has been recognised by Red Dot, having won six Communications Design Awards in the last two years. This year’s winner, the KarTent, will be on display at the Red Dot Design Museum in Essen, Germany, amongst a host of other cutting-edge designs.

 

Read the April 2017 edition of Energy Digital magazine

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May 13, 2021

All but two UK regions failing on school energy efficiency

schools
energyefficiency
Renewables
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Yorkshire & the Humber and the North East are the only UK regions where schools have collectively reduced how much they spend on energy per pupil

Most schools are still "treading water" on implementing energy efficient technology, according to new analysis of Government data from eLight.

Yorkshire & the Humber and the North East are the only regions where schools have collectively reduced how much they spend on energy per pupil, cutting expenditure by 4.4% and 0.9% respectively. Every other region of England increased its average energy expenditure per pupil, with schools in Inner London doing so by as much as 23.5%.

According to The Carbon Trust, energy bills in UK schools amount to £543 million per year, with 50% of a school’s total electricity cost being lighting. If every school in the UK implemented any type of energy efficient technology, over £100 million could be saved each year.

Harvey Sinclair, CEO of eEnergy, eLight’s parent company, said the figures demonstrate an uncomfortable truth for the education sector – namely that most schools are still treading water on the implementation of energy efficient technology. Energy efficiency could make a huge difference to meeting net zero ambitions, but most schools are still lagging behind.

“The solutions exist, but they are not being deployed fast enough," he said. "For example, we’ve made great progress in upgrading schools to energy-efficient LED lighting, but with 80% of schools yet to make the switch, there’s an enormous opportunity to make a collective reduction in carbon footprint and save a lot of money on energy bills. Our model means the entire project is financed, doesn’t require any upfront expenditure, and repayments are more than covered by the energy savings made."

He said while it has worked with over 300 schools, most are still far too slow to commit. "We are urging them to act with greater urgency because climate change won’t wait, and the need for action gets more pressing every year. The education sector has an important part to play in that and pupils around the country expect their schools to do so – there is still a huge job to be done."

North Yorkshire County Council is benefiting from the Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme, which has so far awarded nearly £1bn for energy efficiency and heat decarbonisation projects around the country, and Craven schools has reportedly made a successful £2m bid (click here).

The Department for Education has issued 13 tips for reducing energy and water use in schools.

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