Oct 16, 2012

Marine Power Gains Popularity in the U.S.

Admin
2 min
  Collaborations between the US power industry and academia to develop new technologies for marine power generation are closer than e...

 

Collaborations between the US power industry and academia to develop new technologies for marine power generation are closer than ever before, states a new report by energy experts GlobalData.

The new report shows that the US is working to conduct extensive testing of wave and tidal power devices in open waters, while various universities are working to develop marine technologies.

All ocean energy research in the US is consolidated under the Naval Facilities Command (NAVFAC) and the US Navy has continued its support. The Water Power Program by the US Department of Energy (US DOE) has invested more than $87m in marine and hydrokinetic development projects, and aims to collaborate with universities, laboratories, industry and other agencies working on marine technology in the US to commercially develop and deploy marine technology for power generation.

SEE OTHER TOP STORIES IN THE ENERGY DIGITAL CONTENT NETWORK

The Tides Turn in Renewable Energy

India set to replicate its IT sectors success in solar energy

Read more in Energy Digital's October Issue

Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) estimates the total annual average wave energy off the US coast, calculated at a depth of 60m, at 2,610 terawatt-hours (TWh) per year, with Alaska and the western coast contributing for more than 80% of this. Several projects are planned to capture the energy potential in US waters, and over 80 marine energy projects are in various stages of development, though no tidal power plants are currently commercially active – the US has only one commercially active wave power plant, with 1 megawatt (MW) capacity.

Approximately 50 tidal projects are in various stages of development throughout the US, with many based in Alaska and California. Oregon is the leading generator of hydroelectric power in the US, with close to 300 MW of planned projects lined up for development by Finavera Renewables, Oceanlinx Limited and Ocean Power Technologies, and the neighboring coast of California is also a potential site for wave energy. The state boasts more than 1,200km of coastline and a combined annual average deep water power flux of over 37,000 MW, of which at least 20% can be converted into electricity. The potential of wave energy is sufficient to meet at least 20% of in-state electricity consumption. There are three 100 MW plants planned in both Oregon and California, along with other smaller projects.

On the east coast of the US, Maine and New Jersey have suitable conditions for marine energy development. The states of Washington, California, Alaska, Hawaii, Massachusetts and Oregon also hold potential for ocean energy to be harnessed, and Hawaii is a favorable site for ocean thermal energy conversion.

 

DOWNLOAD THE ENERGY DIGITAL IPAD APP

Share article

Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

Share article