Jan 30, 2014

Polar Vortex not expected at Super Bowl

Admin
2 min
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With the Super Bowl being played in north New Jersey, the question on everyone’s minds has been whether the weather will be about average in the Northeast (mid 30s) on Sunday or if the extreme cold and snow that the area has been experiencing this month will give this year’s NFL title game the nickname of Polar Bowl.

 AccuWeather has been tracking conditions since Dec. 18 on www.WillitSnow.com and the latest forecast indicates players may expect a typical winter day and average chilly temperatures when they take to the field at MetLife Stadium on Sunday evening.

Forecasters with AccuWeather agree that although there may be light snow the day before the game, the brutal cold air of the Polar Vortex will not be present. Temperatures and precipitation will be more consistent with what is considered average for early February, with a daytime high in the 30s. As the first Big Game in history to be played in an open air stadium in a cold weather city, AccuWeather believes players and fans will be relatively lucky in terms of weather.

“Given the time of year and location, we're expecting the best possible conditions, as the Big Game is being played in between arctic systems,” said Henry Margusity, expert senior meteorologist at AccuWeather. “By game time, temperatures will be falling into the 20s and the RealFeel Temperature could be in the teens, but players have certainly dealt with this and even worse conditions before.”

Even in lieu of snow, temperature – and perceived temperature – can be an important concern. When the RealFeel Temperature is very low, players can not only feel cold, but the cold may affect their ability to catch and grip the football and to stay in the game for prolonged periods. The temperature expected for Sunday does not seem to present these challenges.

“Though it seems like we may have escaped the worst in terms of possible weather conditions for game day, there is still a chance that snow and other disruptive winter weather could be a factor in the game,” said Evan Myers, chief operating officer and senior vice president for AccuWeather.

Precipitation, whether in the form of snow or rain, can be a major concern for any outdoor game. Wind can also have a significant impact on the game with strong winds running parallel to the field which can add or subtract lengths to kickoffs, field goals, and long passes.

In addition to its game day forecast, AccuWeather offers ongoing updates at www.WillitSnow.com.

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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