Nov 1, 2016

The renewable energy production of each US state: Part 4

Admin
5 min
This article is part four of five in a series where we’ll be looking at the renewable energy that is produced by each state in the U.S. We take...

This article is part four of five in a series where we’ll be looking at the renewable energy that is produced by each state in the U.S. We take a look at the percentage of green energy that has been generated by each state and provide some interesting data about the renewable energy that is produced there.

Take a look at part one here, two here and three here

31. New Mexico

The renewable energy sources in New Mexico provide 1.4 percent of New Mexico's energy generation. This totals 33,785 billion BTUs which is 0.45 percent of the total United States renewable energy production.

In 2014, New Mexico’s natural gas production accounted for 4.3 percent of all marketed natural gas produced in the United States.

New Mexico ranked sixth in the nation for its utility-scale electricity production from solar energy in 2014.

32. New York

44.79 percent of the energy that New York produces is renewable. This totals 407,678 billion BTUs which is 5.41 percent of the total U.S. renewable energy production.

New York generated more hydroelectric power than any other state east of the Rocky Mountains in 2015. The Robert Moses Niagara hydroelectric power plant in New York is located about four and a half miles downstream from the Falls and is the biggest electricity producer in the state and can generate 2.4 million kilowatts (which is enough to power 24 million 100-watt bulbs at once). The plant is the forth-biggest hydroelectric power plant in the whole of the U.S.

In order to reduce air pollution, in 2012 the state of New York became the first north-eastern state to necessitate that all heating oil that is used needs to be ultra-low sulfur diesel.

33. North Carolina

Renewable sources provide over 25 percent of North Carolina's total energy production which is 147,988 billion BTUs which is 1.96 percent of the total United States energy production.

The state of North Carolina became the forth-largest solar photovoltaics (PV) producer in 2015.

In 2015, North Carolina’s electricity generation came mostly from its nuclear energy industry. Also in that year, 7.1 percent of the state’s utility-scale net electricity production came from renewable resources such as hydroelectric power and solar energy.

34. North Dakota

Renewable energy sources provide 8.11 percent of North Dakota's energy production this totals 82,476 billion BTUs which equates to 1.09 percent of total U.S. renewable energy production.

In 2014, over 17 percent of North Dakota’s net energy generation came from its wind energy industry and roughly 7 percent of its usage came from hydroelectric sources.

Even though North Dakota has a generally low energy consumption rate (411 trillion BTU in 2006) compared to other states (because of its small population), its consumption per capita is among the highest, partly because of the state’s high-energy industrial sector and high heating need in the winter.

35. Ohio

Ohio produces 9.15 percent of its energy through renewable generation. This totals 96,219 billion BTUs which is 1.28 percent of the total United States renewable energy production.

In 2015, coal-fuelled 59 percent of Ohio's net electricity production, natural gas contributed 23 percent and nuclear energy accounted for another 14 percent.

In 2013, Ohio was ranked seventh in the United States for its energy consumption by the industrial industry.

36. Oklahoma

A total of 3 percent of the energy that Oklahoma produces is renewable. This totals 77,187 billion BTUs which is just over one percent of the total United States renewable energy production.

The state of Oklahoma is one of the top natural-gas producing states in the U.S. In 2014, its natural-gas industry produced 7.4 percent of the total U.S. gross production.

Almost 17 percent of the state’s net electricity came from renewable wind energy in 2014.

37. Oregon

Renewable sources provide over 99 percent of Oregon's energy generation. This totals 410,345 billion BTUs which is 5.44 percent of the total United States renewable energy production.

73 percent of Oregon's net electricity production came from hydroelectric power plants and other renewable energy resources in 2014.

After Nevada and California, Oregon is ranked third in the U.S. for its geothermal potential.

In the state of Oregon, there are nearly 1,000 charging outlets along with 404 electric vehicle charging stations.

The Mist field in northwest Oregon is the only producing natural gas field in the Pacific Northwest.

38. Pennsylvania

Renewable sources generate 4.42 percent of Pennsylvania's energy production. This equates to 118,269 billion BTUs which is 1.57 percent of the total United States renewable energy production.

Pennsylvania's yearly natural gas generation (mainly from the Marcellus Shale) surpassed 4 trillion cubic feet in 2014, which doubled its 2012 production and making the state of Pennsylvania the United States second-largest natural gas producer.

Pennsylvania's Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards necessitate that 18 percent of the electricity that is sold by 2021 must come from approved renewable or alternative sources, including at least 0.5 percent from solar photovoltaic (PV) power. In 2015, renewable energy in the state accounted for 4 percent of electricity generation.

39. Rhode Island

Rhode Island produces all of its energy through renewable means. This is mostly down to the states biomass industry which equates to over 90 percent of Rhode Island’s renewable energy production. All of this totals to more than 2,652 billion BTUs which is 0.04 percent of the total United States renewable energy production.

95 percent of electricity produced in Rhode Island in 2015 came from natural gas.

The first United States offshore wind facility is under construction and is located three miles off Rhode Island's Block Island. The five 6-megawatt turbines are predicted to commence operation in late 2016.

Rhode Island is the second-lowest emitter of carbon dioxide across all sectors among all states.

40. South Carolina

16.04 percent of the energy that South Carolina produces is renewable. This totals 104,177 billion BTUs which is 1.38 percent of the total United States renewable energy production.

Renewable energy resources accounted for over five percent of South Carolina's net electricity production in 2015. Nearly 56 percent of that generation came from traditional hydroelectric power.

 

Information Sources: http://energy.gov/maps/renewable-energy-production-state http://www.eia.gov/state/?sid=US http://www.nypa.gov/facilities/niagara.htm

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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