Nov 2, 2016

The renewable energy production of each US state: Part 5

Admin
5 min
This article is the final part in a series of five where we have been looking at the renewable energy that’s produced by each state in the Unit...

This article is the final part in a series of five where we have been looking at the renewable energy that’s produced by each state in the United States. In this final installment, we take a look at the percentage of green energy that has been generated by each state and deliver some interesting facts about the renewable energy that is produced there.

You can view part one here, two here, three here and four here

41. South Dakota

Renewable sources provide over 93 percent of South Dakota's energy production. This totals over 180,030 billion BTUs which is 2.39 percent of the total United States renewable energy production.

South Dakota had more net electricity produced from hydroelectric power than from any other source in 2015. Also in that year, wind and hydroelectric power generated over 70 percent of South Dakota’s total net electricity production.

Roughly 94 percent of South Dakota is fit for wind resource development according to The National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

42. Tennessee

Renewable sources provide more than 35 percent of Tennessee's energy production. This totals over 184,517 billion BTUs which is 2.45 percent of the total U.S. renewable energy production.

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) operates 19 hydroelectric dams, 2 large nuclear power plants, and many more power generation facilities in the state.

Tennessee's net electricity production from hydroelectric power was the third-highest among all of the state’s east of the Mississippi River, and sixth-highest in the nation as a whole. The state used nearly 9.8 million megawatt hours in 2015.

The Southeast's first main wind farm is situated on Tennessee's Buffalo Mountain (close to Oliver Springs). This wind farm started operating as just a 2-megawatt facility in 2000. The wind farm's production capacity now has been expanded to 29 megawatts.

43. Texas

Total renewable energy produced (percent): 2.55

The renewable energy produced in Texas totals over 303,697 billion BTUs. This is 4.03 percent of total United States green energy generation.

According to EIA's Residential Energy Consumption Survey, the average Texas household pays $1,801 per year for their electricity. This is amongst the most expensive in the country along with other hot states like Florida.

Texas generated 29 percent of the total United States marketed natural gas production in 2014, making it the leading natural gas producer among all the states.

In 2014, Texas produced more than 39 million megawatt hours of electricity from wind energy. The state has wind power production capacity of over 16,000 megawatts.

44. Utah

Renewable sources contribute to just over one percent of Utah's total energy production. This totals just 17,055 billion BTUs which works out to be 0.23 percent of the total U.S. renewable energy production.

In 2013, Utah produced 1.7 percent of the total United States coal and shipped 27 percent of that out of the state.

In 2014, Utah had the tenth lowest electricity prices (on average) in the country.

45. Vermont

Renewable sources provide 32.11 percent of Vermont's energy production which totals more than 26,524 billion BTUs which is 0.35 percent of the total United States renewable energy production.

In 2014, (after the permanent closure of the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Plant) Vermont is now producing less than 40 percent of its consumed electricity. The state depends on power from the New England grid and Canada.

Most of Vermont's electricity generation was produced by renewable energy, including hydroelectric, biomass, wind, and solar resources in 2015.

46. Virginia

Renewable sources provide over 10 percent of Virginia's energy production this totals 115,068 billion BTUs which is just over 1.5 percent of the total United States renewable energy production.

In 2015, 39 percent of Virginia's net energy generation came from natural gas.

According to EIA's Residential Energy Consumption Survey, households in Virginia consume 14 megawatt hours of electricity per year and this costs them (on average) $1,584. This is higher than the national average, however; it is similar to households in neighbouring states where electricity is the most common heating fuel.

The Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy were granted the first federal offshore wind energy research lease by the United States Bureau of Ocean Energy Management in 2015.

47. Washington

Renewable sources provide 92.25 percent of Washington's energy production. This totals 826,289 billion BTUs which is more than 10 percent of the total United States renewable energy production.

In 2014, Washington ranked tenth in the U.S. for its generation of electricity sourced from wind energy.

The largest hydroelectric power producer in the United States is The Grand Coulee Dam on Washington's Columbia River. It has a generating capacity of 7,079 megawatts.

Washington was the top generator of electricity from hydroelectric sources in 2014. It also produced 30 percent of the United States net hydroelectricity production.

48. West Virginia

Renewable sources provide 0.95 percent of West Virginia's energy production. This totals 35,572 billion BTUs which equates to 0.47 percent of the total United States renewable energy production.

West Virginia was the eighth biggest natural gas-producing state in the whole of the United States; with more than 1.3 trillion cubic feet of natural gas being produced in 2015.

49. Wisconsin

Renewable sources provide well over 57 percent of Wisconsin's energy production. This totals 179,377 billion BTUs which is 2.38 percent of the total U.S. renewable energy production.

In 2015, just over 8 percent of Wisconsin's electricity generation came from renewable energy resources, coming from biomass, wind, and conventional hydroelectric power.

According to EIA's Residential Energy Consumption Survey, households in Wisconsin use 103 million BTU of energy per home.

There are over 166 solar companies working in the state of Wisconsin. Wisconsin installed 5 MW of solar electricity capacity in 2015. There is enough solar power in the state to power over 4,000 houses.

50. Wyoming

Renewable sources provide 0.34 percent of Wyoming's energy production. This totals 35,013 billion BTUs which is 0.46 percent of the total United States renewable energy production.

39 percent of all coal that was mined in the U.S. in 2013 came from the state of Wyoming. In 2014, 6.6 percent of the total United States natural gas production came from Wyoming.

In 2014, Wyoming had the third lowest average electricity price of any state.

 

Information Sources: http://energy.gov/maps/renewable-energy-production-state http://www.eia.gov/state/?sid=US http://www.seia.org/state-solar-policy/wisconsin http://www.seia.org/state-solar-policy/wyoming

Share article

Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

Share article