Aug 26, 2017

Scientists develop innovative new way of harvesting energy from natural sources

Renewable Energy
Technology
Power Generation
Stuart Hodge
2 min
An international team of scientists has achieved a breakthrough which could transform the way that energy is harvested in the future. Resea...

An international team of scientists has achieved a breakthrough which could transform the way that energy is harvested in the future.

Researchers have developed a ‘twistron harvester’ device which can use energy from natural sources to produce power, by using carbon nanotubes that are twisted into a yarn and put into in an electrolyte.

The twistrons are made up of tiny strands of carbon atoms up to 10,000 times smaller than a hair and can produce enough power from the likes of ambient activity from ocean waves and body movements to power an LED.

The study’s senior author, Ray Baughman, a professor at the University of Texas at Dallas and Director of the NanoTech Institute, is proud of the breakthrough.

He said: "Although numerous alternative harvesters have been investigated for many decades, no other reported harvester provides such high electrical power or energy output per cycle as ours – for stretching rates between a few cycles per second and 600 cycles per second.

"Based on demonstrated average power output, just 31mg of carbon nanotube yarn harvester could provide the electrical energy needed to transmit a two-kilobyte packet of data over a 100m radius every 10 seconds for the Internet of Things."

It’s hoped that the technology could dramatically reduce the need for battery power in the future and perhaps even reduce our dependency on fossil fuels.  The researchers are particularly excited about the potential of using the technology within the ocean, but that’s not yet viable due to the cost of making them.

Baughman added: "Harvesting electrical energy from human motion is one strategy for eliminating the need for batteries.

"If our twistron harvesters could be made less expensively, they might ultimately be able to harvest the enormous amount of energy available from ocean waves.

“At present, these harvesters are most suitable for powering sensors and sensor communications."

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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