Aug 29, 2012

Solyndra Gets Low-Ball Offer from Seagate for Facility

Admin
3 min
  The infamously bankrupt solar manufacturer Solyndra has received a $90.3 million offer from Seagate, a disk-drive maker, for its fa...

 

The infamously bankrupt solar manufacturer Solyndra has received a $90.3 million offer from Seagate, a disk-drive maker, for its factory in Fremont, Calif.

Should Solyndra accept the offer, priced at about 70 percent below the $300 million it cost to construct the plant, the purchase will be complete no later than Feb. 28 of next year. Seagate's offer is the initial bid, which could be toppled by competitors when an auction is held, according to Wednesday's reports.

In 2011, Solyndra's financial adviser and investment banker Imperial Capital LLC started marketing the property to 150 potential buyers to countries around the world, but an acceptable offer never surfaced. When Jones Lang LaSalle Inc was hired in February to market the property, the highest bid came from Seagate.

In the unfortunate case of Solyndra, which received a $535 million federal loan guarantee only to go bankrupt, clean energy advocates have received a lot of political backlash from Republicans who point to the incident as a sign of weak energy policy under the Obama administration.

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But “with all the sensationalism, it's hard to tell fact from fiction,” former VP of Channel Sales at Solyndra, Inc. Scott Starr said in a presentation. “There's a lot of publicity, but no electricity.”

Despite all the hype, Starr says these are all expected trends for a rapidly maturing market. He explains that the industry was well aware that prices would be going down, but they “clearly went down faster than we had forecasted.” It's been a tremendously difficult market to predict and its complexities make picking “winners” very difficult. While the market experienced a significant drop in prices in 2010, it more recently experienced a drop of as great as 40 percent, Starr adds. And while every doubling of capacity of modules on the market is expected to bring down prices, those are usually somewhere around 15 percent. The plummet from around $1.80 per watt to about $1.05 per watt today was much more dramatic.

Pulling through the next few years, some companies will gain the upper hand, some will lower the quality of modules, while developers get caught somewhere in the middle. Ultimately, demand will remain the strongest driver. Despite a few more bumps in the road, however, Starr sees a very positive future for the industry beginning around 2015 as solar moves closer to grid parity. After solar hits retail parity around that time, solar will be well on its way to competing at the wholesale level.

As electricity rates of utilities across the US increase, “I have little doubt that, with the evidence of cost-out in the industry, that solar will get to a place of parity,” Starr said.

 

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Jun 7, 2021

Trafigura and Yara International explore clean ammonia usage

Shipping
fuel
Decarbonisation
ammonia
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Commodity trading company Trafigura and Yara International sign MoU to explore developing ammonia as a clean fuel in shipping

Independent commodity trading company Trafigura and Yara International have signed an MoU to explore developing ammonia as a clean fuel in shipping and ammonia fuel infrastructure.

Reducing shipping emissions is a vital component of the fight against global climate change, yet Greenhouse Gas emissions from the global maritime sector are increasing - and at odds with the IMO's strategy to cut absolute emissions by at least 50% by 2050. 

How more than 70,000 ships can decrease their reliance on carbon-based sources is one of transport's most pressing decarbonisation challenges.

Yara and Trafigura intend to collaborate on initiatives that will establish themselves in the clean ammonia value chain. Under the MoU announced today, Trafigura and Yara intend to work together in the following areas:

  • The supply of clean ammonia by Yara to Trafigura Group companies
  • Exploration of joint R&D initiatives for clean ammonia application as a marine fuel
  • Development of new clean ammonia assets including marine fuel infrastructure and market opportunities

Magnus Krogh Ankarstrand, President of Yara Clean Ammonia, said the agreement is a good example of cross-industry collaboration to develop and promote zero-emission fuel in the form of clean ammonia for the shipping industry. "Building clean ammonia value chains is critical to facilitate the transition to zero emission fuels by enabling the hydrogen economy – not least within trade and distribution where both Yara and Trafigura have leading capabilities. Demand and supply of clean ammonia need to be developed in tandem," he said.  

There is a growing consensus that hydrogen-based fuels will ultimately be the shipping fuels of the future, but clear and comprehensive regulation is essential, according to Jose Maria Larocca, Executive Director and Co-Head of Oil Trading for Trafigura.

Ammonia has a number of properties that require "further investigation," according to Wartsila. "It ignites and burns poorly compared to other fuels and is toxic and corrosive, making safe handling and storage important. Burning ammonia could also lead to higher NOx emissions unless controlled either by aftertreatment or by optimising the combustion process," it notes.

Trafigura has co-sponsored the R&D of MAN Energy Solutions’ ammonia-fuelled engine for maritime vessels, has performed in-depth studies of transport fuels with reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and has published a white paper on the need for a global carbon levy for shipping fuels to be introduced by International Maritime Organization.

Oslo-based Yara produces roughly 8.5 million tonnes of ammonia annually and employs a fleet of 11 ammonia carriers, including 5 fully owned ships, and owns 18 marine ammonia terminals with 580 kt of storage capacity – enabling it to produce and deliver ammonia across the globe.

It recently established a new clean ammonia unit to capture growth opportunities in emission-free fuel for shipping and power, carbon-free fertilizer and ammonia for industrial applications.

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