Apr 24, 2020

Sustainable energy: a systems-led approach

Joanna Clarke, Architect, Acti...
3 min
Even in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, our attention is continually brought back to the climate crisis
Even in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, our attention is continually brought back to the climate crisis. 

Even in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, our attention is continually brought back to the climate crisis. 

In the news, we’ve seen headlines about reduced pollution, cleaner urban waterways and fewer greenhouse gas emissions. They demonstrate that change is possible and, through our actions, we can make a difference.

So how can we help sustain the positive changes we’ve seen? A significant part of this will be achieved through earnest dedication to net zero carbon by 2050.

To date, the government’s energy initiatives have lacked imagination and foresight. Ground and air source heat pumps, for example, continue to be encouraged despite being wholly unsuitable for existing stock, expensive and limited in their ability to meet future demand for truly energy-efficient buildings.

‘Active Buildings’ are one potential low/zero carbon solution: a holistic, systems-based approach, which takes into account the implications of the climate emergency and net-zero targets. 

Evolved from the passive-model, Active Building design focuses on energy efficiency and a degree of energy self-sufficiency, responding to growing demand on the National Grid. It aims to support societal shifts both away from gas-powered heating and toward electric vehicle (EV) adoption.

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This design model takes a broader view of tackling low carbon, with consideration given to building fabric, smart systems, integration with the wider grid network and more. In this way, it is a model designed to answer and withstand the challenges of the climate crisis. 

Defining the system

The systems-based approach which defines Active Buildings is underpinned by six criteria:

  1. Passive design and building fabric: Designing for occupant comfort and low energy use, according to existing passive principles. This includes consideration of orientation and massing, fabric efficiency, natural daylight and natural ventilation. Fundamentally it’s an integrated engineering and architectural approach.

  2. Energy-efficient systems: Energy-efficient and intelligently controlled systems minimising loads, including HVAC, lighting and electrical transportation. Built-in monitoring and standard naming schemas further underscore meaningful data capture which enables optimisation and refinement of predictive control strategies.

  3. On-site renewable energy generation: Incorporation of renewable energy generation where appropriate. Selecting renewable technologies holistically, dependent on site conditions and building load profiles.

  4. Energy storage: Electrical and thermal storage which mitigates peak demand, reducing requirements to oversize systems and enabling greater control.

  5. Electric vehicle integration: Active Buildings should integrate electric vehicle (EV) charging capabilities where possible. As technology advances, bi-directional charging will allow EVs to deliver energy to buildings as required and vice-versa.

  6. Intelligent management of micro-grid integration with national energy network: Active Buildings must be capable of managing their interaction with wider energy networks (e.g. through land shifting, predictive control methods and demand-side response).

The benefits for property managers and homeowners will go beyond saving on their energy bills. Enabling buildings to generate, store and release energy has the potential to empower tenants, giving them greater control over their energy and even the potential to trade energy themselves. 

There are still challenges to be overcome, especially the construction industry’s understanding of retrofit. The easiest place to start will be with future builds, whether housing, offices, schools or otherwise, to develop solutions that can be used to address the existing stock.

We know the problem and we have a potential solution. As the climate emergency is increasingly recognised, how can we not afford to take up the mantle?

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May 18, 2021

Toyota unveils electric van and Volvo opens fuel cell lab

Automotive
electricvehicles
fuelcells
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Toyota's Proace Electric medium-duty panel van is being launched across Europe as Volvo opens its first fuel cell test lab

Toyota is launching its first zero emission battery electric vehicle, the Proace Electric medium-duty panel van, across Europe.

The model, which offers a choice of 50 or 75kWh lithium-ion batteries with range of up to 205 miles, is being rolled out in the UK, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Sweden.

At present, alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs, including battery electric vehicles) account for only a fraction – around 1.8 per cent – of new light commercial van sales in the UK, but a number of factors are accelerating demand for practical alternatives to vans with conventional internal combustion engines.

Low and zero emission zones are coming into force to reduce local pollution and improve air quality in urban centres, at the same time as rapid growth in ecommerce is generating more day-to-day delivery traffic.

Meanwhile the opening of Volvo's first dedicated fuel cell test lab in Volvo Group, marks a significant milestone in the manufacturer’s ambition to be fossil-free by 2040.

Fuel cells work by combining hydrogen with oxygen, with the resulting chemical reaction producing electricity. The process is completely emission-free, with water vapour being the only by-product.

Toni Hagelberg, Head of Sustainable Power at Volvo CE, says fuel cell technology is a key enabler of sustainable solutions for heavier construction machines, and this investment provides another vital tool in its work to reach targets.

"The lab will also serve Volvo Group globally, as it’s the first to offer this kind of advanced testing," he said.

The Fuel Cell Test Lab is a demonstration of the same dedication to hydrogen fuel cell technology, as the recent launch of cell centric, a joint venture by Volvo Group and Daimler Truck to accelerate the development, production and commercialization of fuel cell solutions within long-haul trucking and beyond. Both form a key part of the Group’s overall ambition to be 100% fossil free by 2040.

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