Feb 7, 2014

Waste to energy market growing

Admin
2 min
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The Waste-to-Energy market has grown considerably since incineration first started in 1874. Large markets were established in Europe as well as parts of Asia. However, concerns over harmful by-products of the incineration process, both pollution and public health-related, led to widespread regulatory tightening of dioxin, particulate and refuse fuel emissions, forcing some plants out of business and increasing public opposition to some plant developments.

Despite this, there are renewed growth prospects for the WtE industry. Not only is the world population growing, it is also becoming increasingly urbanized. This leads to greater levels of waste being generated globally, in more concentrated levels and in closer proximity to large urban areas. These issues are focusing more attention on waste management frameworks, with increased interest in alternatives to landfill. As a result, municipalities worldwide are considering the functionality of WtE plants to help deal with mounting waste being generated.

With its ability to effectively manage municipal solid waste (MSW) in relatively small land space, as well as provide energy in the form of electricity and heat, the interest in WtE is growing as an option for sustainable waste management practices.

Although some areas, namely Europe and parts of North America and Asia, have an established WtE market, there are real prospects for growth in regions such as the UK, Asia-Pacific and Eastern Europe. With a combination of mounting environmental concerns, increased governmental policy, more stringent renewable targets and a desire for increased domestic energy production, WtE is set to offer a viable solution.

In its, Waste-to-Energy report, Visiongain covers the CAPEX spending of new and upgraded WtE plants globally and anticipates that spending in the WtE market will total $7.6 million in 2014.

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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