Feb 22, 2014

Wetlands in California and Arizona to be protected

Admin
2 min
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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced the award of $1.56 million in 2013 Wetland Program Development Grants to six tribes in California and Arizona and four California organizations to conduct research designed to prevent and eliminate water pollution. 

Work under these grants, awarded annually, will range from enhancing computer programs that rapidly assess wetland conditions, to helping tribes develop programs to better monitor and protect their wetlands.

 “Wetlands are key to the vitality of local communities and wildlife -- in an era of climate change, healthy wetlands act as natural buffers to floods and sea level rise,” said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s regional administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “Continued support for research and projects to improve water resources is critical in the arid West.”

This is a list of the 2013 grantees:

  • Bishop Paiute Tribe (Bishop, Calif.)
  • Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria (Rohnert Park, Calif.)
  • Pala Tribe (Pala, Calif.)
  • Pinoleville Pomo Nation (Mendocino County, Calif.)
  • Yurok Tribe (Klamath, Calif.)
  • White Mountain Apache Tribe (Whiteriver, Ariz.)
  • East Merced Resource Conservation District (Merced, Calif.)
  • Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Conservancy (West Sacramento, Calif.)
  • San Jose University (San Jose, Calif.)
  • Aquatic Science Center (Richmond, Calif.)

First awarded in 1990, EPA’s Wetland Program Development Grants provide eligible applicants an opportunity to conduct projects that promote the coordination and acceleration of research, investigations, experiments, training, demonstrations, surveys, and studies relating to the causes, effects, extent, prevention, reduction, and elimination of water pollution.

EPA will accept applications for the 2014 grant cycle until April 1. Approximately $1.5 million in federal funding will be available for projects in the Pacific Southwest Region.

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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