Jun 1, 2017

World-leading technology to reduce harmful diesel emissions

Waste Management
Green Tech
Nell Walker
3 min
World-leading technology to reduce harmful diesel emissions
In an industry-first innovation, Loughborough University has developed technology that has the potential to sign...

In an industry-first innovation, Loughborough University has developed technology that has the potential to significantly reduce nitrogen oxide emissions in diesel engines.

There has been growing pressure on the automotive industry to rectify the diesel pollution situation. In 2015, the UK government estimated that NOx exposure from diesel engine emissions led to around 52,000 additional deaths in the nation, and it is also the main cause of smog in major cities.

European NOx reduction targets for on-highway and heavy-duty diesel vehicles are so low that they are almost impossible to adhere to, but new Ammonia Creation and Conversion Technology (ACCT) created by Loughborough University’s School of Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering effectively increases the capacity of existing on-engine after-treatment systems.

Currently, most diesel vehicles include a system which tries to remove the NOx produced by combustion, called a Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system. It uses AdBlue to safely provide the ammonia required to transform NOx into nitrogen and water, but AdBlue only works are very high exhaust temperatures which is limiting.

ACCT, however, uses waste energy to modify AdBlue enabling it to work effectively at lower temperatures. This hugely extends its temperature range, meaning SCR systems can significantly enhance existing NOx reduction systems. ACCT is the first of its kind in the world.

Loughborough’s Professor Graham Hargrave, an internationally acclaimed expert on the optimisation of combustion engines, developed the technology with Research Associate Jonathan Wilson.

“We are all familiar with the ‘cold start’, where diesel vehicles spew out plumes of toxic emissions before their catalytic systems are up to temperature and able to work effectively,” he explains.

“Unfortunately with many vehicles doing short stop/start journeys, such as buses and construction vehicles, many engines never reach the optimal temperature required for the SCR systems to operate efficiently. The result is excessive NOx being released into the urban environment, especially in large cities.

“Our system enables the SCR systems to work at much lower temperatures – as low as 60oC. This means that the NOx reduction system remains active through the whole real world driving cycle, leading to significant reductions in tailpipe emissions.”

Currently the Loughborough technology has been tailored for HGV’s, but the same system is fully scalable for use in all diesel vehicles.

“No viable alternative to the diesel engine currently exists for the heavy duty market and is going to be in use for many more years,” added student Jonathan Wilson. “Systems are needed now that tackle NOx emissions, to help reduce the number of air pollution related deaths and enable vehicle manufactures to meet the ever reducing emissions targets set by the Government. ACCT is the answer.”

The Energy Technology Institute's (ETI) Chief Technology Officer for Heavy Duty Vehicles, Chris Thorne said: “Based upon a brief review, the ACCT technology recently developed by Loughborough has the potential to viably produce gaseous ammonia at temperatures significantly below 190 degrees C, thus enabling increased conversion efficiency and lower NOx emissions.

“It is likely that emissions legislation will become even tighter and vehicle manufacturers will need to develop technologies to address this, and it is our belief that the ACCT technology should be further developed as it could help address this challenge in the real world.”

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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