Aug 15, 2017

Creating energy-efficient robots

energy
technology
Robotics
Nell Walker
3 min
Creating energy-efficient robots
From placing bricks in the toilet cistern, to cling film over the windows, there are many ways to save pennies on your energy bill. In manufactur...

From placing bricks in the toilet cistern, to cling film over the windows, there are many ways to save pennies on your energy bill. In manufacturing, saving energy can be a whole lot simpler and making small but significant changes can drastically reduce energy consumption.

Here, Jonathan Wilkins, marketing director at obsolete industrial parts supplier, EU Automation, discusses how three technologies can improve the energy efficiency of industrial robots.

Manufacturers are introducing more automated systems to the factory floor to streamline the production line and efficiently deliver products to customers. However, as the factory increases its automated processes, it requires more energy to complete production.

With energy efficiency standards becoming stricter, manufacturers aim to reduce carbon emissions across the factory. The introduction of standards, such as ISO 50001, encourages manufacturers to improve energy performance and identify areas where they can reduce energy consumption. Manufacturers can then monitor each asset on the assembly line to determine where they can best save energy.

VSDs

Most industrial machines operate using motors, and around 65 per cent of energy consumption in industry is attributed to these parts.

When monitoring equipment, manufacturers may find that the motors are working faster than required and might even be running when the machine is not in use.

Installing a variable speed drive (VSD) is the best way to reduce motor speed to align with production. This equipment regulates speed and force of an electric motor to adjust the speed based on that of the assembly line. Using this technology prevents unnecessary energy consumption when the machine is working at a slower production rate.

EOT

It is a common misconception that only new equipment will be energy efficient. However, manufacturers that use older equipment also have the opportunity to reduce energy consumption. While obsolete parts are no longer produced by the original equipment manufacturer (OEM), it does not mean that they are not energy efficient.

Some industries, such as the pharmaceutical sector, rely on obsolete parts to keep systems running but also want to ensure that their processes are cost and energy efficient. Technology is advancing quickly, meaning that parts can easily become obsolete. Many of these parts meet current energy efficiency standards, despite no longer being produced, meaning that manufacturers can use them, rather than replacing an entire system.

Relying on parts suppliers can ease the process of sourcing obsolete equipment, as it can be difficult to find the correct component. Using obsolete parts allows manufacturers to optimise their current system, rather than replacing it. Sourcing obsolete also promotes a circular economy as parts are given a longer lifecycle, rather than being disposed of in a landfill.

Software

It is important for robots to run efficiently and use only the required power. However, if the software programming is not frequently updated, the machine will still use excessive amounts of power.

Introducing new software can also improve the energy efficiency of a robot. Manufacturers can monitor and manipulate any asset by creating a digital twin using real-time analytical data. The manufacturer can then determine if the machine is using excessive energy and try to solve the issue using the digital twin before adapting the physical machine, efficiently reducing energy consumption.

These technologies ensure that manufacturers can run efficient machines, providing the best products to customers at the lowest cost and with little impact on the environment. Manufacturers can then save money on utilities bill without the need for bricks in the cistern.

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May 5, 2021

AES Corp seals 10-year carbon-free energy deal with Google

AESCorp
Google
datacenters
Dominic Ellis
3 min
AES Corporation will ensure energy powering Google's Virginia data centers will be '90% carbon free'

The AES Corporation has struck a 10-year supply contract with Google to provide near-carbon-free energy to power its Virginia-based data centers which will start later this year.

Claiming the first clean energy procurement deal in the world of its kind, AES will help ensure that the energy powering those data centers will be 90% carbon-free when measured on an hourly basis.

AES will become the sole supplier of the data centers' carbon-free energy needs on an annual basis, sourcing energy from a portfolio of wind, solar, hydro and battery storage resources to be developed or contracted by AES.

The agreement marks an important step in meeting Google's previously announced goal to run its business on 100% carbon-free energy on an hourly basis by 2030.

"Last year, Google set an ambitious sustainability goal of committing to 100% 24/7 carbon-free energy by 2030. Today, we are proud that through our collaboration with Google, we are making 24/7 carbon-free energy a reality for their data centers in Virginia," said Andrés Gluski, AES President and CEO. "This first-of-its-kind solution, which we co-created with Google, will set a new sustainability standard for companies and organizations seeking to eliminate carbon from their energy supply."

"Not only is this partnership with AES an important step towards achieving Google's 24/7 carbon-free energy goal, it also lays a blueprint for other companies looking to decarbonize their own operations," says Michael Terrell, Director of Energy at Google. "Our hope is that this model can be replicated to accelerate the clean energy transition, both for companies and, eventually, for power grids." 

AES assembled the 500MW portfolio from a combination of AES' own renewable energy projects and those of third-party developers, which were selected, sized and contracted to meet Google's energy needs across a number of considerations, including cost efficiency, additionality and carbon-free energy profile.

The portfolio assembled by AES is expected to require approximately $600 million of investment and generate 1,200 jobs, both permanent and construction, in the host communities. These efforts will greatly simplify Google's energy procurement and management at a competitive price while decarbonizing Google's load and the broader PJM grid.

This supply agreement follows on the strategic alliance AES and Google formed in November 2019 to leverage Google Cloud technology to accelerate innovation in energy distribution and management and advance the adoption of clean energy. AES is pioneering greener, smarter energy innovations, with the goal of expanding the services available to large-scale corporate customers.

The Google.org Impact Challenge on Climate commits €10M to fund bold ideas that aim to use technology to accelerate Europe’s progress toward a greener, more resilient future. Selected organisations may receive up to €2M in funding and possible customised post-grant support from the Google for Startups Accelerator to help bring their ideas to life.

Last year it issued $5.75 billion in sustainability bonds to fund ongoing and new environmentally or socially responsible projects. To read its 2020 Environment report, click here.

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