May 17, 2020

BP Oil Spill Response Probe Leads to First Arrest

energy digital
Oil
crude
Energy
Admin
3 min
Demonstrators protest the BP oil spill
In the first criminal action charges brought against BP during the Deepwater Horizon probe, the Justice Department announced the first arrest made Tues...

In the first criminal action charges brought against BP during the Deepwater Horizon probe, the Justice Department announced the first arrest made Tuesday of a former engineer for the company, Kurt Mix. The 50-year-old is being charged with two counts of obstruction of justice, and is accused of deleting a string of roughly 300 text messages alerting a BP supervisor to the failure of efforts to cap the well during the 2010 disaster.

A federal investigation into the causes of the blowout, centering around involvement of BP, subcontractors Halliburton and Transocean and all implicated employees, has been a probe of interest for some time. The news marks a shift in focus as prosecutors investigate cleanup efforts shortly following the explosion.

Outrage, frustration and hopelessness continue to plague those affected by the spill, and the announcement rubs salt in still-raw wounds as speculation mounts that BP may have deliberately misled the public. The texts in question mention a rate of more than 15,000 barrels of oil a day spilling from the well, three times the rate disseminated through news media coverage of the event.

Feds Make First Arrest in BP Oil Spill Case

A recovered text reads, "Too much flow rate - over 15,000 and too large an orifice."The message was sent May 26, the day a top kill was put in place in efforts to contain the flow of oil. Public statements released by BP gave the top kill a success rate of 60-70%, but it was not until May 29 that failure of the action was announced.

BP has released a statement speaking of its efforts to cooperate with the Justice Department and said, "BP had clear policies requiring preservation of evidence in this case and has undertaken substantial and ongoing efforts to preserve evidence."

SEE RELATED STORIES FROM THE WDM CONTENT NETWORK:

BP’s Settlement Plan with Oil Spill Plaintiffs

BP Denied Part of Gulf Spill Costs from Transocean

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The explosion, leading to the largest oil spill in U.S. history, killed 11 workers and poured 5 million barrels of crude into the ocean. The leak continued for over three months, paralyzing the Gulf of Mexico and resulting in a class-action lawsuit backed by more than 100,000 claims from businesses and individuals who have suffered resulting economic losses. The $7.8 billion civil settlement is up for preliminary approval by a federal judge Wednesday.

Tom Becker, a fisherman in Biloxi, Mississippi, spoke to Time Magazine about the lack of recovery in the area. He has failed to garner any reservations for fishing trips in the months of July, August and September, busy months which would usually be booked up by the spring.

"I don't trust BP one bit,” Becker told the news source. “That's what I've thought all along. It's like, `What are they trying to hide today?'"

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Apr 16, 2021

Hydrostor receives $4m funding for A-CAES facility in Canada

energystorage
Canada
Netzero
Dominic Ellis
2 min
The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to take critical steps toward construction
The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to take critical steps toward construction...

Hydrostor has received $4m funding to develop a 300-500MW Advanced Compressed Air Energy Storage (A-CAES) facility in Canada.

The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to plan construction. 

The project will be modeled on Hydrostor’s commercially operating Goderich storage facility, providing up to 12 hours of energy storage.

The project has support from Natural Resources Canada’s Energy Innovation Program and Sustainable Development Technology Canada.

Hydrostor’s A-CAES system supports Canada’s green economic transition by designing, building, and operating emissions-free energy storage facilities, and employing people, suppliers, and technologies from the oil and gas sector.

The Honorable Seamus O’Regan, Jr. Minister of Natural Resources, said: “Investing in clean technology will lower emissions and increase our competitiveness. This is how we get to net zero by 2050.”

A-CAES has the potential to lower greenhouse gas emissions by enabling the transition to a cleaner and more flexible electricity grid. Specifically, the low-impact and cost-effective technology will reduce the use of fossil fuels and will provide reliable and bankable energy storage solutions for utilities and regulators, while integrating renewable energy for sustainable growth. 

Curtis VanWalleghem, Hydrostor’s Chief Executive Officer, said: “We are grateful for the federal government’s support of our long duration energy storage solution that is critical to enabling the clean energy transition. This made-in-Canada solution, with the support of NRCan and Sustainable Development Technology Canada, is ready to be widely deployed within Canada and globally to lower electricity rates and decarbonize the electricity sector."

The Rosamond A-CAES 500MW Project is under advanced development and targeting a 2024 launch. It is designed to turn California’s growing solar and wind resources into on-demand peak capacity while allowing for closure of fossil fuel generating stations.

Hydrostor closed US$37 million (C$49 million) in growth financing in September 2019. 

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