Aug 14, 2015

Can businesses in Canada avoid the damage of tornado season?

Cutter Slagle
3 min
Tornado season has officially begun in Ca...

Tornado season has officially begun in Canada—and it doesn’t show signs of stopping anytime soon! Scientists are even predicting that an above-average amount of tornados could be hitting the country this summer.

In fact, a tornado recently touched down in Ontario. The damage was severe, as the natural disaster attacked trees, power lines and houses. As well, an even larger tornado tore through Manitoba and smashed fences and buildings for almost three hours. The same was seen in Calgary.

More and more tornados have been seen since June—and for good reason: it’s an El Nino year, which has apparently given tornado activity in Canada a pretty big boost.

Regarding the issue, John Allen, postdoctoral research scientist at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society at Columbia University in Palisades, N.Y. said, “El Nino seems to produce the conditions that we would expect to foster more tornadoes in Canada, similar to what is seen in Florida in El Nino years.”

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Therefore, to help protect businesses, storefronts and employees from meeting various types of damage due to these natural disasters, we’ve put together a list of tips to potentially help keep both people and buildings safe. Take a look.

In order to be properly prepared for upcoming tornadoes, it’s important to make a list. If you’re prepared with a list of variables you can control, then you’re more likely to avoid certain damages. Your list should include the following items:

  • Prepare for and practice an emergency plan for customers and employees
  • Purchase a weather radio and monitor the change in conditions
  • Listen and be able to act on all warnings
  • Keep exterior doors and windows closed
  • Employees should find a basement or small interior room to wait out the storm
  • Consider wind-resistant construction—it’s cost effective and can minimize damage
  • Brace and strap the roof of the building
  • Inspect and repair loose or damaged building components before the storm happens

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It’s also a good idea to have some insurance coverage on your building or store. As mentioned, there are various types of damages that just can’t be avoided—having commercial insurance could help pay for these types of damages. Options for commercial coverage in Canada include SGI Canada, Square One Insurance, and Western Direct.  

Of course, when it comes to natural disasters (in this case, tornadoes), the most important thing to do is protect yourself and employees. However, if you can also protect your store or business from damage and save a little bit of time, money and energy, then why not take the proper precautions to do so?

 [SOURCE: CBC News and Disaster Safety]

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Apr 16, 2021

Hydrostor receives $4m funding for A-CAES facility in Canada

energystorage
Canada
Netzero
Dominic Ellis
2 min
The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to take critical steps toward construction
The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to take critical steps toward construction...

Hydrostor has received $4m funding to develop a 300-500MW Advanced Compressed Air Energy Storage (A-CAES) facility in Canada.

The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to plan construction. 

The project will be modeled on Hydrostor’s commercially operating Goderich storage facility, providing up to 12 hours of energy storage.

The project has support from Natural Resources Canada’s Energy Innovation Program and Sustainable Development Technology Canada.

Hydrostor’s A-CAES system supports Canada’s green economic transition by designing, building, and operating emissions-free energy storage facilities, and employing people, suppliers, and technologies from the oil and gas sector.

The Honorable Seamus O’Regan, Jr. Minister of Natural Resources, said: “Investing in clean technology will lower emissions and increase our competitiveness. This is how we get to net zero by 2050.”

A-CAES has the potential to lower greenhouse gas emissions by enabling the transition to a cleaner and more flexible electricity grid. Specifically, the low-impact and cost-effective technology will reduce the use of fossil fuels and will provide reliable and bankable energy storage solutions for utilities and regulators, while integrating renewable energy for sustainable growth. 

Curtis VanWalleghem, Hydrostor’s Chief Executive Officer, said: “We are grateful for the federal government’s support of our long duration energy storage solution that is critical to enabling the clean energy transition. This made-in-Canada solution, with the support of NRCan and Sustainable Development Technology Canada, is ready to be widely deployed within Canada and globally to lower electricity rates and decarbonize the electricity sector."

The Rosamond A-CAES 500MW Project is under advanced development and targeting a 2024 launch. It is designed to turn California’s growing solar and wind resources into on-demand peak capacity while allowing for closure of fossil fuel generating stations.

Hydrostor closed US$37 million (C$49 million) in growth financing in September 2019. 

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