Nov 10, 2016

Country profile: Australia’s energy sector

Australia
Admin
2 min
Australia is the sixth largest country in the world in terms of landmass, although it is sparsely populated with major population centres on the coas...

Australia is the sixth largest country in the world in terms of landmass, although it is sparsely populated with major population centres on the coasts, especially the east.

Here are a few information soundbites about the country’s energy sector and how it is consumed.

In 2009, Australia was the fourth-highest coal producer in the world. Two-thirds of the energy that is generated in Australia is exported out of the country. This made the country the ninth-largest energy exporter on the globe.

Farming in Australia uses just two percent of the country’s total energy production. This makes it the smallest energy using sector in the whole of Australia.

Every day, over 110 billion mobile phones and eight billion televisions could be powered based on Australia’s total energy usage. You could also boil enough water for 36 billion cups of tea based on the country's natural gas usage.

According to Origin Energy, 73 percent of electricity generation in Australia comes from coal, 13 percent is sourced from natural gas, four percent comes from wind power, seven percent from hydropower, two percent from rooftop solar and one percent from bioenergy.

In 2015, Australia consumed 346 joules (PJ) of renewable energy. This means that in total, just five percent of the energy consumed in the country is from renewable sources.

Hydropower contributes to over 60 percent of all renewable energy that is generated in Australia.

Australia has the highest (on-average) solar radiation per square meter of any continent on the globe and 25 percent of homes in Australia have solar panels on their roofs.

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Apr 16, 2021

Hydrostor receives $4m funding for A-CAES facility in Canada

energystorage
Canada
Netzero
Dominic Ellis
2 min
The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to take critical steps toward construction
The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to take critical steps toward construction...

Hydrostor has received $4m funding to develop a 300-500MW Advanced Compressed Air Energy Storage (A-CAES) facility in Canada.

The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to plan construction. 

The project will be modeled on Hydrostor’s commercially operating Goderich storage facility, providing up to 12 hours of energy storage.

The project has support from Natural Resources Canada’s Energy Innovation Program and Sustainable Development Technology Canada.

Hydrostor’s A-CAES system supports Canada’s green economic transition by designing, building, and operating emissions-free energy storage facilities, and employing people, suppliers, and technologies from the oil and gas sector.

The Honorable Seamus O’Regan, Jr. Minister of Natural Resources, said: “Investing in clean technology will lower emissions and increase our competitiveness. This is how we get to net zero by 2050.”

A-CAES has the potential to lower greenhouse gas emissions by enabling the transition to a cleaner and more flexible electricity grid. Specifically, the low-impact and cost-effective technology will reduce the use of fossil fuels and will provide reliable and bankable energy storage solutions for utilities and regulators, while integrating renewable energy for sustainable growth. 

Curtis VanWalleghem, Hydrostor’s Chief Executive Officer, said: “We are grateful for the federal government’s support of our long duration energy storage solution that is critical to enabling the clean energy transition. This made-in-Canada solution, with the support of NRCan and Sustainable Development Technology Canada, is ready to be widely deployed within Canada and globally to lower electricity rates and decarbonize the electricity sector."

The Rosamond A-CAES 500MW Project is under advanced development and targeting a 2024 launch. It is designed to turn California’s growing solar and wind resources into on-demand peak capacity while allowing for closure of fossil fuel generating stations.

Hydrostor closed US$37 million (C$49 million) in growth financing in September 2019. 

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