ExxonMobil Oil Spill in Yellowstone River

By Admin
As Americans gathered to barbeque and watch fireworks this weekend, nature lovers in Montana got a “crude” awakening to the realities of ag...

As Americans gathered to barbeque and watch fireworks this weekend, nature lovers in Montana got a “crude” awakening to the realities of aging American oil pipeline infrastructure.  An ExxonMobil oil pipeline ruptured Independence Day weekend, spilling 42,000 gallons of crude oil into the Yellowstone River.

Reports are claiming the oil has traveled 150 miles downriver at a speed of 5 to 7 miles per hour.  ExxonMobil has 150 people actively working to clean up the spill along the banks of the Yellowstone River.  The company has deployed 48,000 feet of absorbent boom and 2,200 feet of containment boom. 

SEE OTHER TOP STORIES IN THE WDM CONTENT NETWORK

Former Shell President Says Big Oil Needs No Subsidies

Top 20 Risk Factors Facing the Oil & Gas Industry

Read the latest edition of Energy Digital

The pipeline itself is buried eight feet below the river and extends for 70 miles, supplying crude to ExxonMobil’s refinery in Billings, Montana.

Nearby residents had trouble contacting the appropriate authorities to report the incident considering the holiday weekend. 

While this oil spill is nowhere near the scale of 2010’s BP disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, the implications are similar.  Essentially, cracks in the oil supply chain can lead to disaster.  We know this, yet it continues to happen.  ExxonMobil is acting responsibly and cleaning up its mess, but more messes will most likely follow, especially as pipeline infrastructure continues to age and degrade.  Yes, it’s unfortunate for the birds and turtles that call the river their home, and the landowners who have to deal with contamination.  However, while the incident will undoubtedly create an environmentalist call to arms in the media, it is relatively isolated.  Nonetheless, it is just another wake-up call to the energy sector that, although oil is cheap, there are some very serious risks associated that must be addressed. 

Share

Featured Articles

UK Government awards £54mn in heat network funding

Funding will support the development of schemes in London, Bedfordshire and Woking that use low-carbon heat sources

Shell posts $11.5bn second quarter profit

Shell's earnings fuelled by ongoing price rises and geopolitical instability as the energy major places greater focus on natural gas investments

bp opens first electric truck fast-charging facilities

Operated by bp’s Aral brand, the retail site at Schwegenheim in Rheinland-Pfalz has two 300kw chargers intended for electric trucks

Shell commits to developing Jackdaw gas field in North Sea

Oil & Gas

Prospex Energy raises £1.87m for Selva gas field development

Oil & Gas

Shanghai Electric Group launches low carbon business

Utilities