May 17, 2020

Tax incentives boost Malaysian oil

Admin
2 min
Shallow water offshore oil wells
A decline in production among Malaysias shallow-water reserves has prompted the country to shift its focus towards new development opportunities in dee...

A decline in production among Malaysia’s shallow-water reserves has prompted the country to shift its focus towards new development opportunities in deepwater areas and marginal fields. However, incentives designed to attract investors have only recently been introduced, indicating that further fiscal changes are unlikely to come soon, according to research and consulting firm GlobalData. 

The company’s latest report states that as most of Malaysia’s oil production has historically come from shallow-water areas, the government has been pushed to introduce a number of tax incentives this year to help improve the attractiveness of the country’s fiscal terms and promote further development activity.

Under Production Sharing Contracts (PSCs), marginal fields – defined by reserves of up to 30 million barrels of oil, or 500 billion cubic feet of natural gas – are subject only to petroleum income tax at a rate of 25 percent instead of the usual rate of 35 percent.

Meanwhile, under Risk Service Contracts (RSCs), which are also offered for marginal fields, contractors only pay a corporate income tax of 25 percent, rather than the petroleum income tax.

GlobalData believes that the additional investment allowance introduced by recent legislation should prove to be a significant improvement to Malaysia’s fiscal regime.

“Numerous measures have been involved in the government’s drive to increase production from its marginal fields,”says Jonathan Lacouture, GlobalData’s lead analyst for the Asia-Pacific region. “Since the introduction of RSCs in 2011, there have been two forms of contract into which investors may enter, and this, combined with reductions in the tax liability afforded to marginal fields under 2013 legislation for PSCs, should increase the attractiveness of investment opportunities.”

However, due to these recent changes to Malaysia’s fiscal terms, it is expected that any further alterations will be unlikely over the next few years.

“If the terms do not achieve their desired investment amounts in the medium to long term, the government may decide to make additional changes, but this will depend on short to medium-term results. It is most probable that terms will remain stable until the effects of these recent policies can be assessed,” Lacouture says.

Source: Malaysia Upstream Fiscal and Regulatory Report

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Apr 16, 2021

Hydrostor receives $4m funding for A-CAES facility in Canada

energystorage
Canada
Netzero
Dominic Ellis
2 min
The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to take critical steps toward construction
The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to take critical steps toward construction...

Hydrostor has received $4m funding to develop a 300-500MW Advanced Compressed Air Energy Storage (A-CAES) facility in Canada.

The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to plan construction. 

The project will be modeled on Hydrostor’s commercially operating Goderich storage facility, providing up to 12 hours of energy storage.

The project has support from Natural Resources Canada’s Energy Innovation Program and Sustainable Development Technology Canada.

Hydrostor’s A-CAES system supports Canada’s green economic transition by designing, building, and operating emissions-free energy storage facilities, and employing people, suppliers, and technologies from the oil and gas sector.

The Honorable Seamus O’Regan, Jr. Minister of Natural Resources, said: “Investing in clean technology will lower emissions and increase our competitiveness. This is how we get to net zero by 2050.”

A-CAES has the potential to lower greenhouse gas emissions by enabling the transition to a cleaner and more flexible electricity grid. Specifically, the low-impact and cost-effective technology will reduce the use of fossil fuels and will provide reliable and bankable energy storage solutions for utilities and regulators, while integrating renewable energy for sustainable growth. 

Curtis VanWalleghem, Hydrostor’s Chief Executive Officer, said: “We are grateful for the federal government’s support of our long duration energy storage solution that is critical to enabling the clean energy transition. This made-in-Canada solution, with the support of NRCan and Sustainable Development Technology Canada, is ready to be widely deployed within Canada and globally to lower electricity rates and decarbonize the electricity sector."

The Rosamond A-CAES 500MW Project is under advanced development and targeting a 2024 launch. It is designed to turn California’s growing solar and wind resources into on-demand peak capacity while allowing for closure of fossil fuel generating stations.

Hydrostor closed US$37 million (C$49 million) in growth financing in September 2019. 

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