Apr 24, 2020

Utilising threat intelligence data during COVID-19

Technology
Oil & Gas
Michael McCabe, CEO, Intellige...
3 min
The spread of coronavirus across the world has shown how quickly events can develop and change the course of human activity
The spread of coronavirus across the world has shown how quickly events can develop and change the course of human activity.

The spread of coronavirus across the world has shown how quickly events can develop and change the course of human activity.

From individuals practising social distancing through to supply chains coming under strain to meet countries’ demands. The energy sector is no different – according to IHS Markit, the reduction in oil consumption due to coronavirus has led to a first-half surplus of 1.8bn barrels of crude oil. The volume of available storage for oil production is already running low.

Alongside the impact of coronavirus on country economies, there is also the impact on specific production facilities and operations to consider. Oil rigs have had to develop processes for handling those that have caught the virus, while also protecting their employees that are in place.

Planning ahead in this environment becomes essential, but it is hard to make the right decisions without accurate and objective data. Using threat intelligence in the right way can help.

Threat intelligence in a time of a pandemic

In order to make the best decisions around how to respond to changes, it is essential to take an intelligence-led approach. This data has to include information on wider trends and issues at a global level, but it also has to be practical for those in specific locations to use too. Getting a 10,000-foot overview is great for those managing business operations globally, but those responsible for specific oilfields or installations require this kind of information too.

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To gather this information and make it useful requires both a large amount of data and the analytical skills to make this useful. While raw data can be great for those that understand it, it’s not useful for business leaders without the right context. Similarly, having great analysts and small samples of data can lead to incomplete understanding and poorer planning.

Developing your own approach

It is also not a simple exercise to gather this data. There are multiple data sources and providers, increasing to hundreds or thousands of different data streams for truly international companies. To make this data work in practice, you have to bring together different feeds, systems and applications, especially when each security team within a country can have its own approach.

Sharing, storing and tracking information is difficult in these circumstances, so standardising on one approach that can be made available to everyone is advisable. This joined-up approach ultimately improves efficiency and performance whilst saving the business both time and money. 

By managing your approach to threat intelligence and getting better context in place, you can improve your decision making at multiple levels, based on providing timely and useful insight for all those that need it.

As companies seek to understand what their market situation is, getting the right data will be essential. Without accurate, clear and open data, it’s more difficult to make the right decisions. Whether the world returns to normal after the impact of the coronavirus epidemic – or indeed, whether this becomes the new normal for organisations to cope with – threat intelligence data will be vital for the security of oil and gas companies in the future.

For more information on energy digital topics - please take a look at the latest edition of Energy Digital Magazine.

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Mar 25, 2021

Ineos Energy sells Norwegian business to PGNiG for $615m

upstream
Norway
transition
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Move helps Ineos balance its oil and gas portfolio and open up new opportunities to reinvest further in the energy transition
Move helps Ineos balance its oil and gas portfolio and open up new opportunities to reinvest further in the energy transition...

Ineos Energy is selling its oil and gas business in Norway to PGNiG Upstream Norway for $615 million with the deal covering production, licenses, fields, facilities and pipelines on the Norwegian continental shelf.

Ineos E&P Norge produces around 33,000 BOE per day from the Norwegian Sea with a 93% gas ratio, from 3 non-operated fields, Ormen Lange (14%), Alve (15%) and Marulk (30%). The business also holds 22 offshore licenses, of which 6 are operated, and has equity in the Nyhamna Terminal (8%).

The deal rebalances its portfolio in terms of oil and gas and moves Ineos Energy towards a more operated position.

The sale, subject to approval by the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy and the Norwegian Ministry of Finance, is expected to complete later this year. All 52 employees of INEOS E&P Norge AS will transfer to PGNiG Upstream Norway AS following completion of the deal.

The PGNiG Group is the largest Polish oil and gas company employing 25,000 people worldwide. PGNiG Upstream Norway AS is an integrated exploration and production company established in Norway in 2007 and plays an important role in the supply of gas to Poland.

Brian Gilvary, Executive Chairman of INEOS Energy said: "The deal allows us to monetise a non-operated, predominantly gas portfolio at an attractive price compared to our hold value. This will further balance our portfolio of oil and gas and open up new opportunities to reinvest further into the energy transition. These assets are a very strong strategic fit for PGNiG and significantly extends their position in Norway."

It follows the announcement of the acquisition of the HESS business in Denmark, which consists of operated assets.

PGNiG Upstream Norway and its licence partners brought on stream another three wells in the Ærfugl field last November. This will enable the company to increase its total output of natural gas on the Norwegian Continental Shelf to almost 1 bcm in 2021.

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