AdvanceBio: Next generation, sugar to fuel ethanol tech

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AdvanceBio LLC has developed a next generation, sugar-based ethanol process, which is capable of using sugars from sugar cane, sweet sorghum, sugar...


AdvanceBio LLC has developed a next generation, sugar-based ethanol process, which is capable of using sugars from sugar cane, sweet sorghum, sugar beet and other like-crops as feedstock for producing fuel ethanol and green power, while producing zero liquid waste. When the AdvanceBio sugar-based ethanol technology is built in conjunction with the sugar milling operation, it will have the same low-greenhouse gas footprint as the existing cane-based fuel ethanol industry of Brazil.

"The facilities will be extremely self-sufficient. In addition to eliminating costs associated with outside sources of fossil fuels, power and process water, our technology eliminates the need for extensive waste treatment processes and the cost of transporting large volumes of liquid vinasse back to the cane fields. These ethanol production facilities will also meet stringent U.S. pollution and occupational safety regulations," stated Dale Monceaux, Principal.

"Sugar-based ethanol process technology is capable of supplying environmentally friendly gallons to meet our country's near-term transportation fuel needs and bridge the gap to cellulosic ethanol commercial scale production. In addition, the biomass rich stalk residue called bagasse, that is produced and used to generate steam and power, will be available onsite as a biomass feedstock for cellulosic ethanol production. Furthermore, these projects decentralize ethanol production capacity, moving new volumes from the Corn Belt to southern regions of the United States, near large population centers and markets," Monceaux said.

"Our engineers and technologists employed rigorous process simulation modeling to optimize the ethanol plant design and develop overall plant efficiency, energy and water requirements and emissions criteria, integrating these closely with the sugar milling processes," Monceaux added. “The improving global economy is expected to increase the demand and price of crude oil and spur the next wave of renewable fuel investment. We are working with groups currently developing cane and sweet sorghum-based projects in the United States. Considerable time and financial resources have been invested in developing not only the process technology but also the agricultural practices and systems that supply feedstock to these processing facilities.”




 

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