Jul 23, 2020

Solar energy technology turns seawater into drinking water

solar technology
solar power
Solar Energy
membrane distillation
Jonathan Campion
2 min
Scientists in South Korea have developed a solar-powered membrane to turn seawater or waste water into drinking water using solar power.
Scientists in South Korea have developed a solar-powered membrane to turn seawater or waste water into drinking water using solar power...

This membrane distillation technology was created by two teams of researchers from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) in Seoul - one from the Water Cycle Research Centre led by Dr. Kyung-guen Song, and one from the Centre for Opto-Electronic Materials and Devices, led by Dr. Won-jun Choi. 

In this membrane distillation process, thermal energy is used to evaporate seawater, before it is passed through a hydrophobic membrane that separates the seawater from the water vapour. When the water vapour condenses it forms drinking water.

Because this method of desalination can be undertaken at low temperatures, it is a much more energy-efficient form of thermal desalination.

In this process, the water is heated using solar absorbers. The South Korean teams’ versions of these can absorb up to 85% of solar energy, making them also more efficient than previously designed absorbers.

The greatest need for solar-powered membrane distillation technology is in producing drinking water in underdeveloped parts of the world, or remote and island communities where potable water is hard to source. It is also being suggested that solar technology could be used to provide sources of drinking water at military bases.

Dr. Kyung-guen Song, one of the research leaders from KIST, hinted that the Institute would continue to look for new ways to harness solar power: "This study combines material technologies with water treatment technologies and is significant in that it is a successful case of integrated research that has resulted in revolutionary achievements. We plan to continue developing water treatment technologies that apply advanced materials technologies through ongoing integrated research."

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Apr 20, 2021

Amazon's renewable energy projects surpass 200 milestone

Amazon
Renewables
Solar
Netzero
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Nine new projects announced today takes Amazon's renewables portfolio beyond 200 projects

Amazon claims it is now Europe's largest corporate buyer of renewable energy as its projects surpassed 200 globally.

Broken down, it has 136 solar rooftops on facilities and stores and 71 utility-scale wind and solar projects, nine of which were announced today covering the US, Canada, Spain, Sweden and UK. They include:

First solar project paired with energy storage Based in California’s Imperial Valley, Amazon’s first solar project paired with energy storage allows the company to align solar generation with the greatest demand. The project generates 100MW of solar energy, and includes 70MW storage.

First renewable project in Canada An 80 MW solar project in the County of Newell in Alberta. Once complete, it will produce over 195,000MWh of renewable energy to the grid.

Largest corporate renewable energy project in the UK Amazon’s newest project in the UK is a 350MW wind farm off the coast of Scotland and is Amazon’s largest in the country. It is also the largest corporate renewable energy deal announced by any company in the UK to date.

New projects in the US Amazon’s first renewable energy project in Oklahoma is a 118 MW wind project located in Murray County. Amazon is also building new solar projects in Ohio’s Allen, Auglaize, and Licking counties. Together, these Ohio projects will account for more than 400MW of new energy procurement in the state.

Additional investments in Spain and Sweden In Spain, Amazon’s newest solar projects are located in Extremadura and Andalucia, and together add more than 170 MW to the grid. Amazon’s newest project in Sweden is a 258 MW onshore wind project located in Northern Sweden.

It now has more than 2.5 GW of renewable energy capacity, enough to power more than two million European homes a year, and aims to power all its activities with renewables by 2025 and net zero by 2040.

Amazon and Global Optimism co-founded The Climate Pledge in 2019, a commit ment to reach the Paris Agreement 10 years early and be net-zero carbon by 2040. The pledge now has 53 signatories, including IBM, Unilever, Verizon, Siemens, Microsoft, and Best Buy.

A map of all of Amazon’s renewable energy projects around the world can be found here.

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