May 17, 2020

U.S. Nuclear Power Sector to Face Labor Shortage

U.S.
Nuclear
Energy
Power
Admin
3 min
An aging workforce and unpopularity due to meltdowns will likely see the U.S. nuclear energy sector facing a labor shortage very soon.
The nuclear energy industry in the United States is about to face its biggest labor shortage ever. The post WWII baby boomers that changed the face of...

The nuclear energy industry in the United States is about to face its biggest labor shortage ever.  The post WWII baby boomers that changed the face of the world’s energy sector with the widespread installation of nuclear power plants are now facing retirement.  The only problem is, there’s not enough qualified people to take their place when they do.

39 percent of the U.S. nuclear sector’s workforce will be eligible for retirement by 2016 according to the Nuclear Energy Institute, a Washington D.C.-based trade group.  That’s roughly 25,000 jobs that will need to be filled within the next four years.  However, in 2009 (the most recent year with available data), U.S. universities awarded only 715 graduate and undergraduate degrees related to nuclear energy.  What’s more, that doesn’t account for the decades of experience garnered by the retiring employees that incoming graduates won’t have. 

According to the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, the number of academic institutions offering degrees in nuclear energy shrank from 77 in 1975 to 32 in 2010.  The number of Bachelor’s degrees awarded in 2001 fell to 120 from 863 in 1978.

The reason for the lack of interest in the nuclear sector should be obvious.  Ever since the Three Mile Island core meltdown in the U.S. in 1979, and the Chernobyl disaster a decade later, university students have shied away from the field that was once hailed as the science of tomorrow.  For all intents and purposes, nuclear energy still holds untold promise in securing the world’s energy needs.  However, humankind is still in its infancy as far as understanding the properties of energy at the subatomic level, and the eminent dangers seem to be weighing on the minds of students.

SEE OTHER TOP STORIES IN THE WDM CONTENT NETWORK

25,000 Protest Nuclear Power in Germany

Germany to End Nuclear Power Completely

The Scary Truth About U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Regulation

The recent catastrophe in Japan only added fuel to that fire, with students entering college fearful of choosing a career with the potential to cause harm to the masses, even if they do not fully understand how many lives are saved with the advent of cheap electricity. 

Hopefully coming generations will embrace nuclear power not for its marred past, but for its promising future.  Researchers have advanced nuclear energy to the point where new reactors produce minimal radioactive waste and have far extended lifelines compared to their aging predecessors.  Plus, there are exciting revelations being made into nuclear fusion reactors, which can exponentially increase nuclear capacity and almost eliminate radioactive waste as a byproduct.  Nonetheless, U.S. nuclear energy companies are going to need to work fast to fill the empty desks facing the sector in coming years, and what’s more likely than not is further outsourcing of American jobs. 

Share article

Apr 20, 2021

Amazon's renewable energy projects surpass 200 milestone

Amazon
Renewables
Solar
Netzero
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Nine new projects announced today takes Amazon's renewables portfolio beyond 200 projects

Amazon claims it is now Europe's largest corporate buyer of renewable energy as its projects surpassed 200 globally.

Broken down, it has 136 solar rooftops on facilities and stores and 71 utility-scale wind and solar projects, nine of which were announced today covering the US, Canada, Spain, Sweden and UK. They include:

First solar project paired with energy storage Based in California’s Imperial Valley, Amazon’s first solar project paired with energy storage allows the company to align solar generation with the greatest demand. The project generates 100MW of solar energy, and includes 70MW storage.

First renewable project in Canada An 80 MW solar project in the County of Newell in Alberta. Once complete, it will produce over 195,000MWh of renewable energy to the grid.

Largest corporate renewable energy project in the UK Amazon’s newest project in the UK is a 350MW wind farm off the coast of Scotland and is Amazon’s largest in the country. It is also the largest corporate renewable energy deal announced by any company in the UK to date.

New projects in the US Amazon’s first renewable energy project in Oklahoma is a 118 MW wind project located in Murray County. Amazon is also building new solar projects in Ohio’s Allen, Auglaize, and Licking counties. Together, these Ohio projects will account for more than 400MW of new energy procurement in the state.

Additional investments in Spain and Sweden In Spain, Amazon’s newest solar projects are located in Extremadura and Andalucia, and together add more than 170 MW to the grid. Amazon’s newest project in Sweden is a 258 MW onshore wind project located in Northern Sweden.

It now has more than 2.5 GW of renewable energy capacity, enough to power more than two million European homes a year, and aims to power all its activities with renewables by 2025 and net zero by 2040.

Amazon and Global Optimism co-founded The Climate Pledge in 2019, a commit ment to reach the Paris Agreement 10 years early and be net-zero carbon by 2040. The pledge now has 53 signatories, including IBM, Unilever, Verizon, Siemens, Microsoft, and Best Buy.

A map of all of Amazon’s renewable energy projects around the world can be found here.

Share article