Carbon Capture and Storage for Coal-Fired Plants

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Although currently negligible in prominence, Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) could be the technology that makes the worlds carbon emission reduction...

 

Although currently negligible in prominence, Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) could be the technology that makes the world’s carbon emission reduction targets achievable, say research and consulting firm GlobalData in their latest report.

As the report explains, carbon storage techniques, such as enhanced oil recovery, have been used in the energy sector for decades, but only recently has the concept of long term carbon storage been viewed as a viable means of reducing the amount of carbon released into the atmosphere from power plants.

Correspondingly, a modest 238 megawatts (MW) of CCS capacity was installed globally as of the end of 2011, but according to current government plans and other initiatives, a far more substantial 10 gigawatts (GW) is expected to come online by the end of the decade.

Related Story: Carbon Capture & Storage More Critical than Renewables

CCS refers to the technology of capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) before or after the combustion of fossil fuels (gas or coal), transporting it and pumping it into underground geological formations. This process prevents large quantities of CO2 from being released into the atmosphere by securely storing it between impermeable rock or similar material.

China, the US, Australia, Japan, Norway, the Netherlands and the UK have all invested heavily in CCS Research and Development (R&D) activities and are the global leaders in the industry; however, there are currently no large-scale CCS demonstration projects active for coal-fired plants.

Related Story: SaskPower Turns Carbon Capture Technology Into a Reality

Governments around the world are showing a lack of commitment in significantly reducing fossil fuel consumption, and so CCS could prove the most realistic answer to one of the greatest predicaments of our time. However, GlobalData’s report states that this technology must be employed much more widely in order for CCS to make the level of impact its potential suggests.

Source: GlobalData

Read More in Energy Digital's December/January Issue


 

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