May 17, 2020

Solar Power Breakthrough Makes Solar Cells Obsolete

breakthrough
electricity
Energy
light
Admin
2 min
Light's magnetic effect stronger than thought and may generate electricity
Written By: John Shimkus For at least a century now, scientists have known that light has magnetic properties, yet lights magnetism has been downplayed...

Written By: John Shimkus

For at least a century now, scientists have known that light has magnetic properties, yet light’s magnetism has been downplayed as too weak to serve any tangible purpose. While light’s electric properties have been exploited by the solar power industry to great success, inefficient power conversion has made solar energy expensive and slow to catch on. But now, light’s magnetic effect is gaining attention as University of Michigan professor Stephen Rand believes it may be able to generate electricity without the need for costly solar cells.

Rand’s breakthrough reveals that light's magnetic field is actually 100 million times stronger than previously expected. Strong enough even to produce grid quality electricity. Rand says the magnetic field effect is the result of a unique type of “optical rectification,” a term used to describe what light does when it passes through certain materials. Apparently, when passed through strongly insulated materials, light’s normally weak magnetic field is enhanced immensely.

SEE OTHER TOP STORIES IN THE WDM CONTENT NETWORK
Renewable Geothermal Energy Pumps Up Heat’s Power Potential

Mining Safety: Bioleaching Bacteria Clean Toxic Mine Tailings

The Future of Batteries: A Distributed Approach to Energy Storage

Check out the latest issue of Energy Digital!

Rand believes that this effect can generate electricity, stating, “It turns out that the magnetic field starts curving the electrons into a C-shape and they move forward a little each time. That C-shape of charge motion generates both an electric dipole and a magnetic dipole. If we can set up many of these in a row in a long fiber, we can make a huge voltage and by extracting that voltage, we can use it as a power source."

The problem, however, that arises with exploiting sunlight’s magnetic effect for electricity comes in both the material and the intensity of the light. Glass or transparent ceramics can act as good insulated material, but in order for the effect to be strong enough, the intensity of the light needs to be 10 million watts per square centimeter. Typical sunlight only produces around 0.012 watts per square centimeter. Therefore, either the light needs to be intensified via lens or laser, or the insulator material needs to be modified.

Nonetheless, Rand and his team of researchers believe that once the proper light intensity is reached, then light’s magnetic effect could produce energy at a much cheaper cost than expensive solar cells.

Share article

Oct 19, 2020

Itronics successfully tests manganese recovery process

cleantech
manganese
USA
Scott Birch
3 min
Nevada firm aims to become the primary manganese producer in the United States
Nevada firm aims to become the primary manganese producer in the United States...

Itronics - a Nevada-based emerging cleantech materials growth company that manufacturers fertilisers and produces silver - has successfully tested two proprietary processes that recover manganese, with one process recovering manganese, potassium and zinc from paste produced by processing non-rechargeable alkaline batteries. The second recovers manganese via the company’s Rock Kleen Technology.

Manganese, one of the four most important industrial metals and widely used by the steel industry, has been designated by the US Federal Government as a "critical mineral." It is a major component of non-rechargeable alkaline batteries, one of the largest battery categories sold globally.

The use of manganese in EV batteries is increasing as EV battery technology is shifting to use of more nickel and manganese in battery formulations. But according to the US Department of Interior, there is no mine production of manganese in the United States. As such, Itronics is using its Rock Kleen Technology to test metal recoverability from mine tailings obtained from a former silver mine in western Nevada that has a high manganese content. 

In a statement, Itronics says that its Rock Kleen process recovers silver, manganese, zinc, copper, lead and nickel. The company says that it has calculated – based on laboratory test results – that if a Rock Kleen tailings process is put into commercial production, the former mine site would become the only primary manganese producer in the United States.

Itronics adds that it has also tested non-rechargeable alkaline battery paste recovered by a large domestic battery recycling company to determine if it could use one of its hydrometallurgical processes to solubilize the manganese, potassium, and zinc contained in the paste. This testing was successful, and Itronics was able to produce material useable in two of its fertilisers, it says.

"We believe that the chemistry of the two recovery processes would lend itself to electrochemical recovery of the manganese, zinc, and other metals. At this time electrochemical recovery has been tested for zinc and copper,” says Dr John Whitney, Itronics president. 

“Itronics has been reviewing procedures for electrochemical recovery of manganese and plans to move this technology forward when it is appropriate to do so and has acquired electro-winning equipment needed to do that.

"Because of the two described proprietary technologies, Itronics is positioned to become a domestic manganese producer on a large scale to satisfy domestic demand. The actual manganese products have not yet been defined, except for use in the Company's GOLD'n GRO Multi-Nutrient Fertilisers. However, the Company believes that it will be able to produce chemical manganese products as well as electrochemical products," he adds.

Itronics’ research and development plant is located in Reno, about 40 miles west of the Tesla giga-factory. Its planned cleantech materials campus, which will be located approximately 40 miles south of the Tesla factory, would be the location where the manganese products would be produced.

Panasonic is operating one of the world's largest EV battery factories at the Tesla location. However, Tesla and other companies have announced that EV battery technology is shifting to use of nickel-manganese batteries. Itronics is positioned and located to become a Nevada-0based supplier of manganese products for battery manufacturing as its manganese recovery technologies are advanced, the company states.

A long-term objective for Itronics is to become a leading producer of high purity metals, including the U.S. critical metals manganese and tin, using the Company's breakthrough hydrometallurgy, pyrometallurgy, and electrochemical technologies. ‘Additionally, Itronics is strategically positioned with its portfolio of "Zero Waste Energy Saving Technologies" to help solve the recently declared emergency need for domestic production of Critical Minerals from materials located at mine sites,’ the statement continues.

The Company's growth forecast centers upon its 10-year business plan designed to integrate its Zero Waste Energy Saving Technologies and to grow annual sales from $2 million in 2019, to $113 million in 2025.

Share article