Aug 24, 2018

19 global cities commit to 'net-zero carbon' building pledge

Olivia Minnock
2 min
Leaders of 19 cities around the world have all committed to eliminate carbon emissions from buildings as part of the Net Zero Carbo...

Leaders of 19 cities around the world have all committed to eliminate carbon emissions from buildings as part of the Net Zero Carbon Buildings Declaration.

The agreement, which was signed by various governors and mayors, states that new building portfolios will have zero carbon emissions by 2030, with this applying to all buildings by 2050.

The 19 cities partaking in the initiative are London, Los Angeles, Copenhagen, New York, Johannesburg, Montreal, San Francisco, Paris, Portland, Vancouver, Washington DC, Tokyo, Toronto, Sydney, Stockholm, San Jose, Santa Monica, Tshwane and Newburyport. They represent a total of around 130mn citizens.

See also:

The Climate Group and C40 Cities partner to launch the Zero Emission Vehicle Challenge

Shell becomes member of Carbon Trust programme

Read the latest edition of Energy Digital

Net Zero Buildings are defined as those that use energy ‘ultra-efficiently’ and meet any remaining needs from renewable sources. The agreement has been organised by the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group, which is a network of 90 cities and claims to represent 35% of the global economy in its commitment to addressing climate change.

The declaration states: “We pledge to enact regulations and/or planning policy to ensure new buildings operate at net zero carbon by 2030 and all buildings by 2050.”

The steps toward this goal are to establish a roadmap for commitment to reaching net zero carbon buildings; to develop a suite of supporting incentives and programmes; and to report annually on progress while evaluating the feasibility of reporting on other emissions aside from operation carbon, like refrigerants.

Anne Hidalgo, the Mayor of Paris and Chair of C40, stated: “Paris is home to some of the world’s most beautiful and iconic buildings. As mayors of the world’s great cities we recognise our responsibility to ensure every building, whether historic or brand new, helps deliver a sustainable future for our citizens.

“With this commitment cities are getting the job done, concretely delivering on the Paris Agreement and building better cities for generations to come.”

Yuriko Koike, Governor of Tokyo, said: “Tokyo aims to achieve ‘Zero Emission Tokyo’ that produces no CO2 emissions and has been implementing ambitious actions to reduce CO2 emissions from buildings, such as the Tokyo Cap and Trade Program, which is the first city-level mandatory CO2 emissions reduction program in the world to include office buildings.

“As a member of the C40 steering committee, I will work hand in hand with the world’s major cities, and advance the initiatives.”

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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