Oct 1, 2018

Climate change a key concern as UN Secretary General visits India

Solar
Climate Change
Olivia Minnock
2 min
UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres will discuss the Paris Declaration and UN Sustainable Development Goals on his Indian visit
  UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres makes his first official visit to India this week, with climate issues to...

 

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres makes his first official visit to India this week, with climate issues to feature heavily on the agenda of the three-day trip.

The visit, which coincides with the 150th birthday celebrations of Mahatma Gandhi, will deal with topics such as piece and nonviolence as well as international security, but is also set to discuss climate change which Guterres has cited as a key issue for India, both in the context of the Paris Declaration as well as the wider UN Sustainable Development Goals.

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On Monday, is first day in the country, Guterres is to take part in the General Assembly of the International Solar Alliance. This is the alliance’s inaugural event, having been founded by India and France in March this year with the aim to bring nations together for cooperation in the solar energy industry.

As the alliance was founded, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced India’s commitment to extend nearly $1.4bn in lines of credit for 27 solar projects in 15 countries.

For the rest of the visit, Guterres will meet with President Ram Nath Kovind and Foreign Minister Sushma Swaraj, as well as Modi.

According to the Times of India, the Secretary General said in anticipation of the visit: “Climate change is moving faster than we are, and if we do not change course by 2020, we risk missing the point where we can avoid runaway climate change.”

He cited the impact of climate change on India, such as recent flooding, and added that rising sea levels will pose a risk to India’s substantial coastal population. However, he was positive about the nation’s efforts so far, saying they are currently in line with India’s domestic goals.

 

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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