Oct 21, 2020

Four priorities for Sustainable Aviation Fuels' development

Sustainablefuels
aviation
Europe
Dominic Ellis
2 min
World Economic Forum publishes Joint Policy Proposal to accelerate SAF deployment in Europe
World Economic Forum publishes Joint Policy Proposal to accelerate SAF deployment in Europe...

The World Economic Forum has highlighted four priorities for the development of Sustainable Aviation Fuels (SAF) as governments and airlines are urged to step up efforts to create viable decarbonisation strategies to preserve operations and help avoid future climate crises.  

Given limits on the future supply of feedstock for commercially available SAF pathways, it states "new technology pathways urgently need to be brought to market", despite their current lack of cost competitiveness.  

Four priorities have been outlined as further direct and indirect support is required to ensure SAF production can scale up and meet demand increases.

  • Support innovation to bring lignocellulosic / bio-waste and power-to-liquid pathways to market  
  • Support SAF provision through price floors guaranteed by government during the early stages of deployment
  • Support early deployment by de-risking investment in the first wave of production facilities
  • Announce in 2021 a SAF blending mandate for European aviation to be enforced by no later than 2025 with a blending level increasing progressively over time to 2050 

Through the Forum's Clean Skies for Tomorrow initiative, supported by analysis from Energy Transitions Commission (ETC) and McKinsey & Company, the paper states Europe should pursue "a combination of supply- and demand-side measures to accelerate the uptake of sustainable aviation fuels".

Seven policy pillars for a more sustainable EU aviation ecosystem are also outlined in the report.

  • Create a new long-term policy framework to support the production and consumption of SAF in Europe 
  •  Support the development of radical new aircraft systems, including electric and hydrogen planes
  •  Complete the Single European Skies programme to ensure maximum efficiency of European air traffic
  •  Support fleet renewal for European airlines to improve energy efficiency
  •  Pursue existing carbon pricing policies and strengthen them after the sector recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic
  •  Support the implementation of Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA)
  •  Continue to participate in international diplomatic efforts to reach net-zero emissions from global aviation by mid-century 

With appropriate government support, the current situation could offer an opportunity for the industry to reset itself onto a more sustainable path, the report concludes.

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May 13, 2021

All but two UK regions failing on school energy efficiency

schools
energyefficiency
Renewables
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Yorkshire & the Humber and the North East are the only UK regions where schools have collectively reduced how much they spend on energy per pupil

Most schools are still "treading water" on implementing energy efficient technology, according to new analysis of Government data from eLight.

Yorkshire & the Humber and the North East are the only regions where schools have collectively reduced how much they spend on energy per pupil, cutting expenditure by 4.4% and 0.9% respectively. Every other region of England increased its average energy expenditure per pupil, with schools in Inner London doing so by as much as 23.5%.

According to The Carbon Trust, energy bills in UK schools amount to £543 million per year, with 50% of a school’s total electricity cost being lighting. If every school in the UK implemented any type of energy efficient technology, over £100 million could be saved each year.

Harvey Sinclair, CEO of eEnergy, eLight’s parent company, said the figures demonstrate an uncomfortable truth for the education sector – namely that most schools are still treading water on the implementation of energy efficient technology. Energy efficiency could make a huge difference to meeting net zero ambitions, but most schools are still lagging behind.

“The solutions exist, but they are not being deployed fast enough," he said. "For example, we’ve made great progress in upgrading schools to energy-efficient LED lighting, but with 80% of schools yet to make the switch, there’s an enormous opportunity to make a collective reduction in carbon footprint and save a lot of money on energy bills. Our model means the entire project is financed, doesn’t require any upfront expenditure, and repayments are more than covered by the energy savings made."

He said while it has worked with over 300 schools, most are still far too slow to commit. "We are urging them to act with greater urgency because climate change won’t wait, and the need for action gets more pressing every year. The education sector has an important part to play in that and pupils around the country expect their schools to do so – there is still a huge job to be done."

North Yorkshire County Council is benefiting from the Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme, which has so far awarded nearly £1bn for energy efficiency and heat decarbonisation projects around the country, and Craven schools has reportedly made a successful £2m bid (click here).

The Department for Education has issued 13 tips for reducing energy and water use in schools.

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