Jan 18, 2018

IFC puts together $188mn finance package for Jordan's largest photovoltaic power plant

Solar
Middle East
Andrew Woods
2 min
International Finance Corporation to fund Jordan's largest renewable project
International Finance Corporation (IFC) has arranged a financing package of up to $188 million to fund the largest solar photovoltaic power plant in...

International Finance Corporation (IFC) has arranged a financing package of up to $188 million to fund the largest solar photovoltaic power plant in Jordan.

The investment from IFC – a member of the World Bank Group, – is the latest in a series of efforts to boost renewable energy investments in a country faced with increased energy demand.

The financing package for the 248-megawatt Baynouna facility developed by Masdar and Abu Dhabi Future Energy Company, includes $54 million from IFC’s own account and $134 million mobilised from other senior lenders including a parallel loan from Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). This will be the first time JICA has invested in a private project finance transaction in the region.

Other lenders to the project include Dutch Development bank FMO and Europe Arab Bank as B lenders and OFID, the OPEC Fund for International Development and German development bank DEG as parallel lenders.

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So far, IFC has invested over $300 million across 13 projects, enabling well over $1 billion in private sector investments in Jordan’s power distribution and generation sectors.

Mohamed Jameel Al Ramahi, Chief Executive Officer of Masdar said: “The diversity of financial institutions supporting Baynouna illustrates both IFC’s successful track record with the private sector in emerging markets over the last 60 years and the strength of its commitment to best practice. With backing now secured from lenders in Asia, Europe and the Middle East, the significant global interest in commercial renewable energy in Jordan and the MENA region is clear.”

Mouayed Makhlouf, IFC Director for the Middle East and North Africa said: “Renewable energy is a pillar of IFC’s work, in the region and beyond. We have already financed several major projects, encouraging private investment in the sector and pioneering innovative financing models. We stand ready to support Jordan in meeting its growing energy needs and becoming a model for renewable energy investments.”

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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