May 21, 2018

Lightyear to manufacture a vehicle powered from 100% solar energy

Solar
Electric Vehicles
Sophie Chapman
2 min
The Dutch solar vehicle manufacturer, Lightyear, has announced that it will invest finances raised from its series A fundin...

The Dutch solar vehicle manufacturer, Lightyear, has announced that it will invest finances raised from its series A funding to develop a car powered by 100% solar energy.

According to the firm, the amount travelled by the total number of cars in the world per year is a lightyear, or 9.5trn kilometres.

The company’s ultimate goal is to match that distance with electric vehicles (EVs) alone, lowering the globe’s fossil fuel consumption.

“By 2035, we want one electric lightyear to have been driven. For this goal, we are providing a scalable path forward,” stated Lightyear.

“Currently, only 3% of the world has access to the infrastructure to comfortably use an electric car.”

“On most of those places, the prerequisites to build that infrastructure are not available either. This results in a chicken-and-egg problem that we want to crack by cutting out the middle man.”

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Lightyear argues that EVs are not as easily accessible due to a lack of infrastructure supporting them.

The company is developing a vehicle that can run for months without having to be charged, and can be powered through the night.

“We are building an electric car that charges itself, directly from the sun. To create the biggest possible impact, we are moving towards our mission in two steps.

“First, we’re building an electric car that works anywhere. Secondly, and perhaps the most important, we will continue to build on that concept to create a car that can work for anyone.”

Lightyear will use curved, solar panels allowing light to be absorbed from several angles, as well as adding to the design’s aesthetic.

The vehicle will be able to travel between 400-800km with its laminate solar panels protected from a variety of weather conditions.

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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