Jul 23, 2018

McDonald's joins Starbucks to develop sustainable products, pledges $5mn

Sustainability
James Henderson
2 min
McDonald's joins Starbucks to develop sustainable products, pledges $5mn
McDonald’s has joined Starbucks & Closed Loop Partners in a partnership to develop a recyclable and/or compostable cup solu...

McDonald’s has joined Starbucks & Closed Loop Partners in a partnership to develop a recyclable and/or compostable cup solution through NextGen Cup Consortium and Challenge. 

Each year, an estimated 600bn paper and plastic cups are distributed worldwide, most of which are not recyclable or compostable.

In a statement, McDonald’s said that as the world’s largest restaurant company, it has the responsibility and opportunity to take action on some of the most pressing social and environmental challenges in the world today.

“One of these challenges is packaging and waste. Our customers tell us that this is their number one environmental concern. We’re listening and taking action.

“In January, we announced new packaging and recycling goals and as part of these efforts, we’re excited to announce a groundbreaking new collaboration.”

Marion Gross, Senior Vice President and Chief Supply Chain Officer, McDonald’s USA, commented: “McDonald’s is committed to using our scale for good to make positive changes that impact our planet and the communities we serve.

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“We are excited to join Starbucks and Closed Loop to help solve this pressing challenge as collaboration is key to finding a scalable, lasting global solution.”

McDonald’s is committing $5 million in partnership with Closed Loop Partners to help launch the NextGen Cup Consortium and Challenge announced earlier this year, bringing the total contributed to $10 million.

The NextGen Cup Challenge will be open to supply chain leaders, innovators, solution providers and anyone with promising solutions to recover single use cups.

The initial focus of the challenge is on the fiber-based hot and cold cup, starting with identifying solutions for a fully recyclable and/or compostable cup system in North America.

Awardees will receive acceleration funding up to $1mn based on key milestones. Up to seven of the awardees will enter a six-month accelerator programme to help scale their solutions.

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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