Apr 20, 2018

Sainsbury’s launches first delivery service with electric cargo bikes

Energy Efficiency
Sustainability
Sophie Chapman
2 min
The UK retail company, Sainsbury’s, is launching a new trail as it delivers groceries with electric cargo bikes. The fir...

The UK retail company, Sainsbury’s, is launching a new trail as it delivers groceries with electric cargo bikes.

The firm will be delivering online orders from its Streatham Common store to locations across South London with a fleet of five bikes.

Sainsbury’s aims to deliver up to 100 orders a day in a bid to offer services no matter where or when its customers shop.

“We’re delighted to be the first supermarket to trial grocery deliveries by electric cargo bikes,” commented Clodagh Moriarty, Director of Online at Sainsbury’s.

“We’re always looking for new ways to make sure we can best serve our customers and this trial will help us explore whether there might be a more flexible way to deliver Sainsbury’s groceries to those who live in busy cities.”  

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The company has partnered with e-cargobikes.com which has provided the purpose-built, zero-emission bikes.

The bikes have a large enough capacity to carry several orders at once, allowing the firm to evaluate if bike transportation is a time-effective means in a busy city.

“We’re thrilled to be working with Sainsbury’s on this trial,” stated James FitzGerald, Managing Director of e-cargobikes.com.

“By taking existing e-cargobike technology and putting it to the test in a new market, we’re reimagining grocery deliveries and exploring a more sustainable transport system.” 

Image: Sainsbury’s

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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