Oct 16, 2017

Toyota’s hydrogen fuel cell truck is being tested at the Port of LA

Hydrogen
Technology
Sophie Chapman
2 min
Port of LA using hydrogen-fueled Toyota truck
A concept version of Toyota’s hydrogen fuel cell truck is being used to move goods from the Port of Los Angeles. This is...

A concept version of Toyota’s hydrogen fuel cell truck is being used to move goods from the Port of Los Angeles.

This is part of a feasibility study, part of which is to test the port’s efforts to reduce harmful emissions.

The truck will be travelling short-haul drayage routes, departing from the Port of LA or Long Beach, moving goods to rail yards and warehouses for distribution.

Toyota has estimated the vehicle will travel around 200 miles per day. These shorter journeys are to test the duty-cycle capabilities of the fuel cell system, with longer haul routes to be introduced as the journey progresses.

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The Japanese company announced its plan to build zero-emission, hydrogen fuel cell trucks last April. The truck generates more than 670 horsepower and 1,325 pound-fleet of torque from two Mirai fuel cell stacks and a 12kWh batter.

Hydrogen fuel cells use compressed hydrogen as their fuel to allow them to only release water vapour as an emission.

Vehicles powered by hydrogen have recently attainted performance and range numbers high enough to replace the average gasoline-powered car.

The difficulty these vehicles face is the lack of fuelling stations, which are often the most easily accessible at ports and warehouses.

Toyota began selling hydrogen-powered vehicles in 2015, with its Mirai Seda, and plans to continue with a hydrogen-powered bus to be released this year in Tokyo.

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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