The UK’s food and drink industry has cut emissions by more than half

By Sophie Chapman
According to the Food and Drink Federation’s (FDF) latest report, companies such as Coca-Cola, Mars, and Mondelez, have successfully reduce...

According to the Food and Drink Federation’s (FDF) latest report, companies such as Coca-Cola, Mars, and Mondelez, have successfully reduced carbon emissions by 51% against a 1990 baseline.

Food and drink firms including Britvic, PepsiCo, and Warburtons are also amongst the group who focused on energy efficiency and decarbonisation.

However, the reduction of carbon emissions can also be attributed to a fall in production across the industry.

“The food and drink manufacturing industry continue to deliver progress against our environmental ambitions,” commented Helen Munday, Chief Scientific Officer at FDF.

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FDF has opened access to its Sustainability Resource Hub, making it available to the public.

The Hub features information on voluntary certifications, collaborative platforms, and practical tools with the aim of increasing sustainability credentials for manufacturers.

 “The Sustainability Resource Hub is the next step on our journey to support a shift towards integrating sustainable sourcing into decision making at all levels throughout the supply chain and achieving our Ambition 2025,” added Ms Munday.

“We hope this tool will provide companies, particularly small- to-medium sized ones, with practical guidance to contribute to their sustainability goal.”

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