Nov 21, 2017

University of Massachusetts to conduct study into if wind and fishing industries can coexist

U.S.
Wind
Sophie Chapman
2 min
UMass to research if wins and fishing industries can coexist
The University of Massachusetts (UMass) plans to launch a research project into offshore wind farms and commercial fishing.

The University of Massachusetts (UMass) plans to launch a research project into offshore wind farms and commercial fishing.

The University has received help from Deepwater Wind – a company based in Rhode Island and aims to join the wind industry within the state – who invested US$1mn dollars to the project.

The dubbed Blue Economy Initiative will receive the money over five years as it looks into how offshore farms can coexist will other industries.

The UMass Dartmouth School for Marine Science and Technology via the Massachusetts Marine Fisheries Institute will lead the research.

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“The growth of offshore wind energy in the U.S. provides researchers with a tremendous opportunity to examine this new industry and how it can coexist with other ocean users, particularly commercial fishermen,” reported CEO of Deepwater Wind, Jeffrey Grybowski.

“We’re proud to support this new Blue Economy Initiative at UMass, which is perfectly positioned to produce leading-edge research that will guide the continuing development of the offshore wind industry.”

Massachusetts is home to the nation’s most lucrative fishing port, New Bedford, which also has plans to enter the offshore wind industry.

“This is an important example of industry-academic collaboration that advances a mutual interest in understanding the intersection of ocean-based industries and advanced technologies,” said UMass President Marty Meehan.

“It also further strengthens the university’s position, and that of the UMass Dartmouth’s School of Marine Science in particular, as a national center of excellence in research of ocean industries.”

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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