Veolia and the University of East Anglia sign contract to lower carbon emissions

By Sophie Chapman
The global resource management group Veolia, has signed a new 10-year combined heat and power (CHP) contract through its subsidiary group Veo...

The global resource management group Veolia, has signed a new 10-year combined heat and power (CHP) contract through its subsidiary group Veolia CHP UK Limited.

The contract between Veolia and the University of East Anglia (UEA), agreed to reduce carbon emissions, will see two of the latest generation Veolia CHP units installed on the campus, as well as the company providing low carbon electricity.

The 4MWe CHP units will aid the reduction of the 320-acre, Norwich campus' carbon emissions by 35% by 2020, against a 1990 baseline, and support their ‘Sustainable Ways’ vision.

Veolia will also provide lifetime monitoring and maintenance for the installation, under the new CHP agreement.

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“These latest CHP engines replaced the original engines installed in 1999 and, along with a third existing CHP engine, will allow us to generate over 80% of electricity onsite, reducing costs and carbon dioxide emissions,” said UEA representative, Richard Bettle.

The units will annually generate approximately 30GWh of electricity, helping the university reduce its annual emissions by a further 4,000 tonnes.

The system will use a district heating and cooling network and electrical infrastructure to supply the 18,800-body campus.

This is the conclusive stage of UEA’s three-year project that has seen a variety of new, more energy-efficient boilers, pumps, and thermal stores installed.

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