Mar 20, 2020

Are businesses being overcharged for energy?

Utilities
Energy Efficiency
Martyn Young, Director, ZTP
3 min
The past year has seen energy suppliers being told to make redress payments by OFGEM of over £11.4m to mainly domestic customers for overcharging
The past year has seen energy suppliers being told to make redress payments by OFGEM of over £11.4m to mainly domestic customers f...

The past year has seen energy suppliers being told to make redress payments by OFGEM of over £11.4m to mainly domestic customers for overcharging.

It is easy to make assumptions that this is deliberate but few CEOs would deliberately court front-page news by overtly overcharging in such a heavily scrutinised market, and the likelihood is that other factors are to blame, such as internal controls on communication, failure to react to legislative/regulatory changes, and training.

It is sometimes difficult to sympathise with an Energy Supplier as they are often portrayed as large corporations with no empathy towards their customers, however when it comes to the complexity of the makeup of charges on an energy bill the UK has ended up with a very complex system, and there are so many interested parties involved in the decision-making that any simplification will be slow to arrive.

Under Government direction, OFGEM has over the years significantly intervened in the price setting and billing process in the energy retail market, with an example being the price cap being introduced in the domestic sector. OFGEM is not the only regulator complicating the calculation of bills though as HMRC also play a role in setting VAT and CCL rules, with different rates, exemptions for some industry schemes, complex de-minimis rules and rules on exemptions depending on building use, sometimes requiring apportionment.

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The process of billing energy is complex compared to many other industries as there is a variety of “Pass Through” costs that need to be applied. Unlike billing for a manufactured product, which may consist of many component parts and processes, this not purely a commercial pricing decision, it needs to be accurate or be open to regulatory challenge. In addition, suppliers need to be aware and apply rules based on individual customers, such as the Warm Homes Discount, industry exemptions such as EII exemptions and Climate Change agreements, as well as accurately recording meters changing ownership.

An additional complexity is that some of the charges on electricity are taken not at the meter reading level but are adjusted upwards to recover losses in the delivery process, emulating distributed and generated energy

The increase in available consumption data through the increase in half-hourly power settlement has already started to increase the complexity of billing, and as we move further into an energy data world we will see increases in the complexity of distribution and generation charging through local networks. Customers will be placing a lot more trust in their energy suppliers getting billing right the first time.

The complexity of billing has created a mini-industry of third-party billing validation services.  It is strange that the inaccuracy of billing is at such a level that this service exists. A small number of these providers emulate the billing process and are now capable of predicting bills for large consumers using energy trades and consumption patterns, allowing clients to free up working capital.

By Martyn Young, Director of ZTP (www.ztpuk.com) - the energy management and software specialist.

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Apr 16, 2021

Hydrostor receives $4m funding for A-CAES facility in Canada

energystorage
Canada
Netzero
Dominic Ellis
2 min
The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to take critical steps toward construction
The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to take critical steps toward construction...

Hydrostor has received $4m funding to develop a 300-500MW Advanced Compressed Air Energy Storage (A-CAES) facility in Canada.

The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to plan construction. 

The project will be modeled on Hydrostor’s commercially operating Goderich storage facility, providing up to 12 hours of energy storage.

The project has support from Natural Resources Canada’s Energy Innovation Program and Sustainable Development Technology Canada.

Hydrostor’s A-CAES system supports Canada’s green economic transition by designing, building, and operating emissions-free energy storage facilities, and employing people, suppliers, and technologies from the oil and gas sector.

The Honorable Seamus O’Regan, Jr. Minister of Natural Resources, said: “Investing in clean technology will lower emissions and increase our competitiveness. This is how we get to net zero by 2050.”

A-CAES has the potential to lower greenhouse gas emissions by enabling the transition to a cleaner and more flexible electricity grid. Specifically, the low-impact and cost-effective technology will reduce the use of fossil fuels and will provide reliable and bankable energy storage solutions for utilities and regulators, while integrating renewable energy for sustainable growth. 

Curtis VanWalleghem, Hydrostor’s Chief Executive Officer, said: “We are grateful for the federal government’s support of our long duration energy storage solution that is critical to enabling the clean energy transition. This made-in-Canada solution, with the support of NRCan and Sustainable Development Technology Canada, is ready to be widely deployed within Canada and globally to lower electricity rates and decarbonize the electricity sector."

The Rosamond A-CAES 500MW Project is under advanced development and targeting a 2024 launch. It is designed to turn California’s growing solar and wind resources into on-demand peak capacity while allowing for closure of fossil fuel generating stations.

Hydrostor closed US$37 million (C$49 million) in growth financing in September 2019. 

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