May 17, 2020

More than 80% of U.S. oil comes from 5 states and the Gulf of Mexico

Admin
2 min
Crude oil production
[email protected] The March issue of Energy Digital magazine is live Five states and the Gulf of Mexico supplied 6 million barrels per day, more tha...

The March issue of Energy Digital magazine is live

Five states and the Gulf of Mexico supplied 6 million barrels per day, more than 80 percent, of the crude oil produced in the United States in 2013. Texas provided almost 35 percent, according to preliminary 2013 data released in Energy Information Administration's March Petroleum Supply Monthly.

The second-largest state producer was North Dakota with 12 percent of U.S. crude oil production, followed by California and Alaska at close to 7 percent each and Oklahoma at 4 percent. The federal offshore Gulf of Mexico produced 17 percent.

Total U.S. crude oil production grew 15 percent in 2013 to 7.4 million barrels per day. Texas and North Dakota led that growth, with their crude oil outputs each increasing 29 percent from 2012, according to EIA. Production gains in both states came largely from shales, especially the Eagle Ford in Texas and the Bakken in North Dakota. In the three years since 2010, North Dakota's crude oil output has grown 177 percent and Texas's output 119 percent, the fastest in the nation.

Three other states that were among the top 10 U.S. producers in 2013 also experienced production growth rates above 20 percent during the past three years. Colorado, which overlies part of the Niobrara Shale, had 93 percent growth in production from 2010 to 2013; Oklahoma, with the Woodford Shale, had 62 percent growth; and New Mexico, which shares the Permian Basin with Texas, had 51 percent growth.

Crude oil is produced in 31 states and two offshore federal regions – the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific Coast. Of those 33 producing areas, 10 supply more than 90 percent of U.S. output. While nine of those top 10 areas were also among the top 10 producers five years ago, their relative contributions have changed.

North Dakota has risen from the seventh largest oil producer to the third. The Gulf of Mexico, Alaska, and California, which together in 2008 supplied nearly half of U.S. crude production mainly from conventional oil reservoirs, provided less than one-third of national output in 2013. Output in those areas has declined at the same time that overall national production has expanded.

Source: Energy Information Administration

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Apr 16, 2021

Hydrostor receives $4m funding for A-CAES facility in Canada

energystorage
Canada
Netzero
Dominic Ellis
2 min
The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to take critical steps toward construction
The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to take critical steps toward construction...

Hydrostor has received $4m funding to develop a 300-500MW Advanced Compressed Air Energy Storage (A-CAES) facility in Canada.

The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to plan construction. 

The project will be modeled on Hydrostor’s commercially operating Goderich storage facility, providing up to 12 hours of energy storage.

The project has support from Natural Resources Canada’s Energy Innovation Program and Sustainable Development Technology Canada.

Hydrostor’s A-CAES system supports Canada’s green economic transition by designing, building, and operating emissions-free energy storage facilities, and employing people, suppliers, and technologies from the oil and gas sector.

The Honorable Seamus O’Regan, Jr. Minister of Natural Resources, said: “Investing in clean technology will lower emissions and increase our competitiveness. This is how we get to net zero by 2050.”

A-CAES has the potential to lower greenhouse gas emissions by enabling the transition to a cleaner and more flexible electricity grid. Specifically, the low-impact and cost-effective technology will reduce the use of fossil fuels and will provide reliable and bankable energy storage solutions for utilities and regulators, while integrating renewable energy for sustainable growth. 

Curtis VanWalleghem, Hydrostor’s Chief Executive Officer, said: “We are grateful for the federal government’s support of our long duration energy storage solution that is critical to enabling the clean energy transition. This made-in-Canada solution, with the support of NRCan and Sustainable Development Technology Canada, is ready to be widely deployed within Canada and globally to lower electricity rates and decarbonize the electricity sector."

The Rosamond A-CAES 500MW Project is under advanced development and targeting a 2024 launch. It is designed to turn California’s growing solar and wind resources into on-demand peak capacity while allowing for closure of fossil fuel generating stations.

Hydrostor closed US$37 million (C$49 million) in growth financing in September 2019. 

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