Oct 20, 2017

Singapore introduce first water tariff increase in 17 years

Asia
Sophie Chapman
2 min
Singapore introduce higher tariff on water in 2017
This year the Public Utilities Board of Singapore (PUB) instituted its first tariff raise since 2000. The rise is in order...

This year the Public Utilities Board of Singapore (PUB) instituted its first tariff raise since 2000.

The rise is in order to secure the country’s future water needs, as well as managing the risk of extreme weather conditions and water scarcity propelled by climate change.

The increase was instituted to fund new investments towards NEWater and desalination sources; PUB expect the alternative source will contribute to 85% of Singapore’s future water needs by 2060.

Funding for risk assessment of extreme weather and water scarcity was also a contributing factor, with Singapore’s weather conditions expected to get more extreme in the future.

The increase in tariff is part of a long-term strategy, with rates in the city-state increasing by 30% phased over two years. The next increase is projected for 2018.

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Due to decades of investment in desalination and wastewater reuse facilities and despite being one year into the five-year election cycle, the government only implemented the rate hike this year.

“To encourage prudent usage and ensure sustainability, PUB prices water to the cost of producing it from the next available source, which is likely to be from NEWater and desalination,” reported a spokesperson from PUB.

PUB’s investment in water infrastructure is predicted to cost approximately US$4bn over the next five years.

The countries tariffs are still relatively low compared to Europe and America, however, partly due to the government’s subsidising drainage costs.

These findings were sourced from the Global Water Tariff Survey 2017, and were published in a new White Paper entitled The Global Value of Water by GWI and the Global Water Leaders Group (GWLG) in partnership with Arup.

Find out more about the Global Water Tariff Survey 2017 and The Global Value of Water here

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Apr 16, 2021

Hydrostor receives $4m funding for A-CAES facility in Canada

energystorage
Canada
Netzero
Dominic Ellis
2 min
The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to take critical steps toward construction
The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to take critical steps toward construction...

Hydrostor has received $4m funding to develop a 300-500MW Advanced Compressed Air Energy Storage (A-CAES) facility in Canada.

The funding will be used to complete essential engineering and planning, and enable Hydrostor to plan construction. 

The project will be modeled on Hydrostor’s commercially operating Goderich storage facility, providing up to 12 hours of energy storage.

The project has support from Natural Resources Canada’s Energy Innovation Program and Sustainable Development Technology Canada.

Hydrostor’s A-CAES system supports Canada’s green economic transition by designing, building, and operating emissions-free energy storage facilities, and employing people, suppliers, and technologies from the oil and gas sector.

The Honorable Seamus O’Regan, Jr. Minister of Natural Resources, said: “Investing in clean technology will lower emissions and increase our competitiveness. This is how we get to net zero by 2050.”

A-CAES has the potential to lower greenhouse gas emissions by enabling the transition to a cleaner and more flexible electricity grid. Specifically, the low-impact and cost-effective technology will reduce the use of fossil fuels and will provide reliable and bankable energy storage solutions for utilities and regulators, while integrating renewable energy for sustainable growth. 

Curtis VanWalleghem, Hydrostor’s Chief Executive Officer, said: “We are grateful for the federal government’s support of our long duration energy storage solution that is critical to enabling the clean energy transition. This made-in-Canada solution, with the support of NRCan and Sustainable Development Technology Canada, is ready to be widely deployed within Canada and globally to lower electricity rates and decarbonize the electricity sector."

The Rosamond A-CAES 500MW Project is under advanced development and targeting a 2024 launch. It is designed to turn California’s growing solar and wind resources into on-demand peak capacity while allowing for closure of fossil fuel generating stations.

Hydrostor closed US$37 million (C$49 million) in growth financing in September 2019. 

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