Sustainable tidal energy, EV charging & hydrogen power

News roundup: the potential of sustainable tidal energy, GenCellEnergy’s off-grid EV charging & Siemens’ green hydrogen plant in Germany

Israel’s GenCellEnergy launches off-grid EV charging

GenCellEnergy, the Israeli provider of hydrogen and ammonia to power fuel cell solutions, has announced the launch of GenCell EVOX, a new off-grid EV charging solution that leverages alkaline fuel cells, hydrogen and ammonia to power technologies.

Commenting on the new launch, Rami Reshef, CEO GenCell, said: "This launch is excellent news for site owners, EV charging service providers and environmentalists alike. The EVOX can be deployed quickly anywhere, it's scalable, and it will go a long way towards eliminating range anxiety for EV drivers. EVOX brings triple the value to our customers – not only off-grid power for EV charging stations, but also backup power in case of outages as well as power to sell-to-grid in the event of peak load demands." 

 

Siemens commissions 8.75MW green hydrogen plant in Germany

Siemens has commissioned one of Germany’s largest green hydrogen generation plants, it has been announced.

Siemens said that the hydrogen generation plant has an electrical capacity of 8.75 megawatts. Located in Wunsiedel, Upper Franconia, it is one of Germany's largest green hydrogen generation plants. It has been planned digitally and commissioned by Siemens, demonstrating the key role hydrogen can play in the country’s energy future.

“With global warming, energy dependency and rising costs becoming increasingly pressing issues, real-world solutions for the future of energy are crucial,” said Matthias Rebellius, Member of the Managing Board of Siemens AG and CEO of Smart Infrastructure. “The Wunsiedel project is an excellent demonstration of how vision and initiative combined with the right technology and financing can drive forward the development of a carbon-free power supply.”

The UK Government lacks faith in sustainable tidal energy

Stuart Murphy, Founder & Inventor at renewable energy company TPGen24 discusses the sustainable advantages of tidal energy & the UK government’s response.

“Writing today, an average of only 40% of the UK’s country’s energy comes from renewables, putting us a long way off achieving our Net Zero 2050 targets, let alone meeting the surging societal demand for electricity. 

“Furthermore, none of the active sustainable resources within our current infrastructure are able to deliver 100% clean base load. 

“Essentially, base load represents the minimum amount of electricity required to keep the lights on during peak demand. However, the operational intermittency of the most prolific and popular renewables, wind and solar, due to their reliance on exact meteorological conditions, mean we are still reliant on fossil fuels to plug the generation gaps when the weather is not just so. 

“This represents a massive weakness and, until it’s resolved we will be at the mercy of gas, coal and expensive imports from pariah nations.”

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